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Sequential effects of reappraisal and rumination on anger during recall of an anger-provoking event

(2019) PLOS ONE. 14.
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Abstract
In everyday life, people often combine strategies to regulate their emotions. However, to date, most research has investigated emotion regulation strategies as if they occur independently from one another. The current study aims to better understand the sequential interplay between strategies by investigating how reappraisal and rumination interact to affect anger experience. After participants (N = 156) recalled a recent anger-provoking event, they were instructed to either a) reappraise the event twice, b) reappraise the event, and then ruminate about the event, c) ruminate about the event, and then reappraise the event, or d) ruminate twice about the event. The effects of the first strategy used replicated a large body of research: reappraisal was associated with a decrease in anger, but rumination was associated with no change in anger. There was a small interactive effect of the combination of the two strategies, such that those who ruminated and then reappraised showed a larger decrease in anger than those who reappraised and then ruminated. There were no other differences between groups. This suggests that the second strategy does have an effect over and beyond the first strategy, but this effect is small in size, highlighting the importance of the initial emotion regulation strategy used.
Keywords
EMOTION REGULATION STRATEGIES, COGNITIVE REAPPRAISAL, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, ANGRY RUMINATION, DISTRACTION, SUPPRESSION, EXPERIENCE, IMPACT, MODEL

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Peuters, Carmen, Elise K Kalokerinos, Madeline Lee Pe, et al. “Sequential Effects of Reappraisal and Rumination on Anger During Recall of an Anger-provoking Event.” PLOS ONE 14 (2019): n. pag. Print.
APA
Peuters, C., Kalokerinos, E. K., Pe, M. L., & Kuppens, P. (2019). Sequential effects of reappraisal and rumination on anger during recall of an anger-provoking event. PLOS ONE, 14.
Chicago author-date
Peuters, Carmen, Elise K Kalokerinos, Madeline Lee Pe, and Peter Kuppens. 2019. “Sequential Effects of Reappraisal and Rumination on Anger During Recall of an Anger-provoking Event.” Plos One 14.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Peuters, Carmen, Elise K Kalokerinos, Madeline Lee Pe, and Peter Kuppens. 2019. “Sequential Effects of Reappraisal and Rumination on Anger During Recall of an Anger-provoking Event.” Plos One 14.
Vancouver
1.
Peuters C, Kalokerinos EK, Pe ML, Kuppens P. Sequential effects of reappraisal and rumination on anger during recall of an anger-provoking event. PLOS ONE. 2019;14.
IEEE
[1]
C. Peuters, E. K. Kalokerinos, M. L. Pe, and P. Kuppens, “Sequential effects of reappraisal and rumination on anger during recall of an anger-provoking event,” PLOS ONE, vol. 14, 2019.
@article{8587464,
  abstract     = {In everyday life, people often combine strategies to regulate their emotions. However, to date, most research has investigated emotion regulation strategies as if they occur independently from one another. The current study aims to better understand the sequential interplay between strategies by investigating how reappraisal and rumination interact to affect anger experience. After participants (N = 156) recalled a recent anger-provoking event, they were instructed to either a) reappraise the event twice, b) reappraise the event, and then ruminate about the event, c) ruminate about the event, and then reappraise the event, or d) ruminate twice about the event. The effects of the first strategy used replicated a large body of research: reappraisal was associated with a decrease in anger, but rumination was associated with no change in anger. There was a small interactive effect of the combination of the two strategies, such that those who ruminated and then reappraised showed a larger decrease in anger than those who reappraised and then ruminated. There were no other differences between groups. This suggests that the second strategy does have an effect over and beyond the first strategy, but this effect is small in size, highlighting the importance of the initial emotion regulation strategy used.},
  articleno    = {e0209029},
  author       = {Peuters, Carmen and Kalokerinos, Elise K and Pe, Madeline Lee and Kuppens, Peter},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keywords     = {EMOTION REGULATION STRATEGIES,COGNITIVE REAPPRAISAL,INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES,ANGRY RUMINATION,DISTRACTION,SUPPRESSION,EXPERIENCE,IMPACT,MODEL},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {16},
  title        = {Sequential effects of reappraisal and rumination on anger during recall of an anger-provoking event},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0209029},
  volume       = {14},
  year         = {2019},
}

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