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Leaf herbivory is more impacted by forest composition than by tree diversity or edge effects

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Abstract
Links between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are well established. Beyond biodiversity per se, community composition can have strong effects on ecosystem functioning. Furthermore, spatial processes including edge effects, can impact the diversity-functioning relationship. These spatial processes are especially relevant within a food web context, such as the transfer of plant biomass across the food chain through herbivory. The relative importance of diversity, community composition and spatial context on herbivory pressure at the community and the species level is, however, poorly understood. To fill this gap in our understanding, we studied to what degree herbivory in temperate forest plots varies according to edge distance, tree diversity and forest composition. In contrast to the prevailing view of tree herbivory increasing at forest edges, we found that the effects of forest edge and tree diversity on leaf herbivory were masked by effects of forest composition, i.e. the specific contributions of the tree species. The strongest composition effect found was increased herbivory on Quercus robur in the presence of Fagus sylvatica. Our findings highlight that neither edge distance, tree diversity, nor the interaction affected one ecosystem function, namely herbivory, whilst tree community composition did. This warrants consideration of identity and composition effects in future studies if we are to deepen our understanding of the determinants of ecosystem functions across systems. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier GmbH on behalf of Gesellschaft fur Okologie.
Keywords
ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION, ASSOCIATIONAL SUSCEPTIBILITY, INSECT HERBIVORES, SPECIES-DIVERSITY, PLANT TRAITS, BIODIVERSITY, RESISTANCE, ABUNDANCE, FRAGMENTATION, HABITAT, Herbivory, Edge effects, Biodiversity, Composition effects

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Chicago
van Schrojenstein Lantman, Irene M., Lionel R. Hertzog, Martijn L. Vandegehuchte, An Martel, Kris Verheyen, Luc Lens, and Dries Bonte. 2018. “Leaf Herbivory Is More Impacted by Forest Composition Than by Tree Diversity or Edge Effects.” Basic and Applied Ecology 29: 79–88.
APA
van Schrojenstein Lantman, I. M., Hertzog, L. R., Vandegehuchte, M. L., Martel, A., Verheyen, K., Lens, L., & Bonte, D. (2018). Leaf herbivory is more impacted by forest composition than by tree diversity or edge effects. BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY, 29, 79–88.
Vancouver
1.
van Schrojenstein Lantman IM, Hertzog LR, Vandegehuchte ML, Martel A, Verheyen K, Lens L, et al. Leaf herbivory is more impacted by forest composition than by tree diversity or edge effects. BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY. Jena: Elsevier Gmbh, Urban & Fischer Verlag; 2018;29:79–88.
MLA
van Schrojenstein Lantman, Irene M., Lionel R. Hertzog, Martijn L. Vandegehuchte, et al. “Leaf Herbivory Is More Impacted by Forest Composition Than by Tree Diversity or Edge Effects.” BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY 29 (2018): 79–88. Print.
@article{8587141,
  abstract     = {Links between biodiversity and ecosystem functioning are well established. Beyond biodiversity per se, community composition can have strong effects on ecosystem functioning. Furthermore, spatial processes including edge effects, can impact the diversity-functioning relationship. These spatial processes are especially relevant within a food web context, such as the transfer of plant biomass across the food chain through herbivory. The relative importance of diversity, community composition and spatial context on herbivory pressure at the community and the species level is, however, poorly understood. To fill this gap in our understanding, we studied to what degree herbivory in temperate forest plots varies according to edge distance, tree diversity and forest composition. In contrast to the prevailing view of tree herbivory increasing at forest edges, we found that the effects of forest edge and tree diversity on leaf herbivory were masked by effects of forest composition, i.e. the specific contributions of the tree species. The strongest composition effect found was increased herbivory on Quercus robur in the presence of Fagus sylvatica. Our findings highlight that neither edge distance, tree diversity, nor the interaction affected one ecosystem function, namely herbivory, whilst tree community composition did. This warrants consideration of identity and composition effects in future studies if we are to deepen our understanding of the determinants of ecosystem functions across systems. (C) 2018 Published by Elsevier GmbH on behalf of Gesellschaft fur Okologie.},
  author       = {van Schrojenstein Lantman, Irene M. and Hertzog, Lionel R. and Vandegehuchte, Martijn L. and Martel, An and Verheyen, Kris and Lens, Luc and Bonte, Dries},
  issn         = {1439-1791},
  journal      = {BASIC AND APPLIED ECOLOGY},
  keyword      = {ECOSYSTEM FUNCTION,ASSOCIATIONAL SUSCEPTIBILITY,INSECT HERBIVORES,SPECIES-DIVERSITY,PLANT TRAITS,BIODIVERSITY,RESISTANCE,ABUNDANCE,FRAGMENTATION,HABITAT,Herbivory,Edge effects,Biodiversity,Composition effects},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {79--88},
  publisher    = {Elsevier Gmbh, Urban \& Fischer Verlag},
  title        = {Leaf herbivory is more impacted by forest composition than by tree diversity or edge effects},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.baae.2018.03.006},
  volume       = {29},
  year         = {2018},
}

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