Advanced search
1 file | 32.50 MB Add to list

The application of freely-available satellite imagery for informing and complementing archaeological fieldwork in the “Black Desert” of North-Eastern Jordan

(2018) GEOSCIENCES . 8(12).
Author
Organization
Abstract
Recent developments in the availability of very high-resolution satellite imagery through platforms like GoogleEarth (Google, Santa Clara County, CA, USA) and Bing Maps (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA) have greatly opened up the possibilities of their use by researchers. This paper focusses on the exclusive use of free remote sensing data by the Western Harra Survey (WHS), an archaeological project investigating the arid “Black Desert” of north-eastern Jordan, a largely impenetrable landscape densely strewn with basalt blocks. The systematic analysis of such data by conducting a holistic satellite survey prior to the commencement of fieldwork allowed for the precise planning of ground surveys, with advanced knowledge of which sites were vehicle-accessible and how to efficiently visit a stratified sample of different site types. By subsequently correlating the obtained ground data with this analysis, it was possible to create a typological seriation of the site forms known as “wheels”, determine that at least two-thirds of sites are within 500 m of valleys or mudflats (highlighting these features’ roles as access routes and resource clusters) and identify numerous anthropogenic paths cleared through the basalt for site access and long-distance travel. These results offer new insights into this underrepresented region and allow for supra-regional comparisons with better investigated areas by a method that is rapid and cost-effective.
Keywords
remote sensing, free satellite imagery, GoogleEarth, Bing Maps, archaeological fieldwork, arid environments, basalt desert, landscape accessibility, Harra, Jordan

Downloads

  • Smith & Chambrade 2018 - Free Satellite Imagery for Archaeological Fieldwork in Black Desert - Geosciences 8(12), 491.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 32.50 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Smith, Stefan Lorenz, and Marie-Laure Chambrade. “The Application of Freely-available Satellite Imagery for Informing and Complementing Archaeological Fieldwork in the ‘Black Desert’ of North-Eastern Jordan.” Ed. Deodato Tapete. GEOSCIENCES 8.12 (2018): n. pag. Print.
APA
Smith, S. L., & Chambrade, M.-L. (2018). The application of freely-available satellite imagery for informing and complementing archaeological fieldwork in the “Black Desert” of North-Eastern Jordan. (D. Tapete, Ed.)GEOSCIENCES , 8(12).
Chicago author-date
Smith, Stefan Lorenz, and Marie-Laure Chambrade. 2018. “The Application of Freely-available Satellite Imagery for Informing and Complementing Archaeological Fieldwork in the ‘Black Desert’ of North-Eastern Jordan.” Ed. Deodato Tapete. Geosciences 8 (12).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Smith, Stefan Lorenz, and Marie-Laure Chambrade. 2018. “The Application of Freely-available Satellite Imagery for Informing and Complementing Archaeological Fieldwork in the ‘Black Desert’ of North-Eastern Jordan.” Ed. Deodato Tapete. Geosciences 8 (12).
Vancouver
1.
Smith SL, Chambrade M-L. The application of freely-available satellite imagery for informing and complementing archaeological fieldwork in the “Black Desert” of North-Eastern Jordan. Tapete D, editor. GEOSCIENCES . MDPI AG; 2018;8(12).
IEEE
[1]
S. L. Smith and M.-L. Chambrade, “The application of freely-available satellite imagery for informing and complementing archaeological fieldwork in the ‘Black Desert’ of North-Eastern Jordan,” GEOSCIENCES , vol. 8, no. 12, 2018.
@article{8586297,
  abstract     = {Recent developments in the availability of very high-resolution satellite imagery through platforms like GoogleEarth (Google, Santa Clara County, CA, USA) and Bing Maps (Microsoft, Redmond, WA, USA) have greatly opened up the possibilities of their use by researchers. This paper focusses on the exclusive use of free remote sensing data by the Western Harra Survey (WHS), an archaeological project investigating the arid “Black Desert” of north-eastern Jordan, a largely impenetrable landscape densely strewn with basalt blocks. The systematic analysis of such data by conducting a holistic satellite survey prior to the commencement of fieldwork allowed for the precise planning of ground surveys, with advanced knowledge of which sites were vehicle-accessible and how to efficiently visit a stratified sample of different site types. By subsequently correlating the obtained ground data with this analysis, it was possible to create a typological seriation of the site forms known as “wheels”, determine that at least two-thirds of sites are within 500 m of valleys or mudflats (highlighting these features’ roles as access routes and resource clusters) and identify numerous anthropogenic paths cleared through the basalt for site access and long-distance travel. These results offer new insights into this underrepresented region and allow for supra-regional comparisons with better investigated areas by a method that is rapid and cost-effective.},
  articleno    = {491},
  author       = {Smith, Stefan Lorenz and Chambrade, Marie-Laure},
  editor       = {Tapete, Deodato},
  issn         = {2076-3263},
  journal      = {GEOSCIENCES },
  keywords     = {remote sensing,free satellite imagery,GoogleEarth,Bing Maps,archaeological fieldwork,arid environments,basalt desert,landscape accessibility,Harra,Jordan},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  publisher    = {MDPI AG},
  title        = {The application of freely-available satellite imagery for informing and complementing archaeological fieldwork in the “Black Desert” of North-Eastern Jordan},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/geosciences8120491},
  volume       = {8},
  year         = {2018},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric