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Progress in hydrometallurgical technologies to recover critical raw materials and precious metals from low-concentrated streams

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Organization
Abstract
Critical and precious metals are essential in many modern applications. While their natural sources are depleting, one must adapt to guarantee a reliable supply by developing new and optimizing existing techniques to recover the elements from unexplored material flows. The aquatic phase is of great meaning to this issue, as migration from solid to liquid streams is ubiquitous during industrial manipulation of the raw materials. The resulting (waste) waters are characterized by low concentrations and varying chemical composition. Hence, hydrometallurgical technologies should cope with such specific system conditions and physico-chemical properties of critical and precious metals when elaborating a recovery strategy. This review provides an overview of the present status and outlook on technologies used to recover critical metals from solution, including cementation, precipitation, reduction, ion exchange, solvent extraction, electrochemical methods and adsorption onto novel, sustainable materials. Special attention is given to adsorption technology, which is considered as one of the most promising metal recovery options owing to its facile implementation, low cost, high availability and high removal efficiencies even at low target metal concentrations. Key directions are suggested to tackle existing challenges in the field of resource recovery and improve the sustainability of future material cycling.
Keywords
Hydrometallurgy, Metal recovery, Critical raw materials, Waste water treatment, Adsorption, SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION, PLATINUM-GROUP METALS, IRON-OXIDE NANOPARTICLES, ZERO-VALENT IRON, ION-EXCHANGE, ORGANIC FRAMEWORK, MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES, SOLVENT-EXTRACTION, AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS, LEACH SOLUTIONS

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Citation

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MLA
Perez, Jeffrey Paulo et al. “Progress in Hydrometallurgical Technologies to Recover Critical Raw Materials and Precious Metals from Low-concentrated Streams.” RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING 142 (2019): 177–188. Print.
APA
Perez, J. P., Folens, K., Leus, K., Vanhaecke, F., Van Der Voort, P., & Du Laing, G. (2019). Progress in hydrometallurgical technologies to recover critical raw materials and precious metals from low-concentrated streams. RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING, 142, 177–188.
Chicago author-date
Perez, Jeffrey Paulo, Karel Folens, Karen Leus, Frank Vanhaecke, Pascal Van Der Voort, and Gijs Du Laing. 2019. “Progress in Hydrometallurgical Technologies to Recover Critical Raw Materials and Precious Metals from Low-concentrated Streams.” Resources Conservation and Recycling 142: 177–188.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Perez, Jeffrey Paulo, Karel Folens, Karen Leus, Frank Vanhaecke, Pascal Van Der Voort, and Gijs Du Laing. 2019. “Progress in Hydrometallurgical Technologies to Recover Critical Raw Materials and Precious Metals from Low-concentrated Streams.” Resources Conservation and Recycling 142: 177–188.
Vancouver
1.
Perez JP, Folens K, Leus K, Vanhaecke F, Van Der Voort P, Du Laing G. Progress in hydrometallurgical technologies to recover critical raw materials and precious metals from low-concentrated streams. RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING. 2019;142:177–88.
IEEE
[1]
J. P. Perez, K. Folens, K. Leus, F. Vanhaecke, P. Van Der Voort, and G. Du Laing, “Progress in hydrometallurgical technologies to recover critical raw materials and precious metals from low-concentrated streams,” RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING, vol. 142, pp. 177–188, 2019.
@article{8585053,
  abstract     = {Critical and precious metals are essential in many modern applications. While their natural sources are depleting, one must adapt to guarantee a reliable supply by developing new and optimizing existing techniques to recover the elements from unexplored material flows. The aquatic phase is of great meaning to this issue, as migration from solid to liquid streams is ubiquitous during industrial manipulation of the raw materials. The resulting (waste) waters are characterized by low concentrations and varying chemical composition. Hence, hydrometallurgical technologies should cope with such specific system conditions and physico-chemical properties of critical and precious metals when elaborating a recovery strategy. This review provides an overview of the present status and outlook on technologies used to recover critical metals from solution, including cementation, precipitation, reduction, ion exchange, solvent extraction, electrochemical methods and adsorption onto novel, sustainable materials. Special attention is given to adsorption technology, which is considered as one of the most promising metal recovery options owing to its facile implementation, low cost, high availability and high removal efficiencies even at low target metal concentrations. Key directions are suggested to tackle existing challenges in the field of resource recovery and improve the sustainability of future material cycling.},
  author       = {Perez, Jeffrey Paulo and Folens, Karel and Leus, Karen and Vanhaecke, Frank and Van Der Voort, Pascal and Du Laing, Gijs},
  issn         = {0921-3449},
  journal      = {RESOURCES CONSERVATION AND RECYCLING},
  keywords     = {Hydrometallurgy,Metal recovery,Critical raw materials,Waste water treatment,Adsorption,SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION,PLATINUM-GROUP METALS,IRON-OXIDE NANOPARTICLES,ZERO-VALENT IRON,ION-EXCHANGE,ORGANIC FRAMEWORK,MAGNETIC NANOPARTICLES,SOLVENT-EXTRACTION,AQUEOUS-SOLUTIONS,LEACH SOLUTIONS},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {177--188},
  title        = {Progress in hydrometallurgical technologies to recover critical raw materials and precious metals from low-concentrated streams},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.resconrec.2018.11.029},
  volume       = {142},
  year         = {2019},
}

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