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Passively transferred M2e-specific monoclonal antibody reduces influenza A virus transmission in mice

(2018) ANTIVIRAL RESEARCH. 158. p.244-254
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Abstract
Influenza represents a global public health threat. Currently available influenza vaccines are effective against strain-matched influenza A and B viruses but do not protect against novel pandemic viruses. Vaccine candidates that target conserved B or T cell epitopes of influenza viruses could circumvent this shortcoming. The conserved extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) of influenza A is an example of such a broadly protective vaccine candidate. Protection by M2e-based vaccine candidates largely depends on M2e-specific IgG antibodies. Here we show that the M2e-specific IgG2a monoclonal antibody 65 (MAb 65) can reduce influenza A/Udorn/72 (H3N2) and A/Hong Kong/68 (H3N2) virus plaque formation. This effect was not observed with other influenza A virus strains tested. We further show that passive transfer of MAb 65 to mice can reduce viral loads in the upper and lower airways, which results in reduced transmission of A/Udorn/72 and A/Hong Kong/68 viruses to cohoused, unimmunized contact mice. Virus restriction by passively transferred Mab 65 was significantly less pronounced in Fcgr1(-/-) Fcgr3(-/-) mutant mice compared with wild type controls, suggesting that in vivo protection provided by MAb 65 depends on Fc gamma receptor-mediated antibody effector mechanisms. We conclude that M2e-based antibody immune therapy has the potential to diminish influenza A virus replication in the immunized host as well as in exposed naive contacts.
Keywords
Influenza A virus, Mouse transmission model, M2 ectodomain, Broadly protecting antibody, EXTRACELLULAR DOMAIN, MATRIX PROTEIN-2, M2 PROTEIN, HOUSEHOLD TRANSMISSION, AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION, IMMUNE-RESPONSES, MOUSE MODEL, H1N1 VIRUS, INFECTION, PROTECTION

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Citation

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Chicago
Kolpe, Annasaheb, Bert Schepens, Liang Ye, Peter Staeheli, and Xavier Saelens. 2018. “Passively Transferred M2e-specific Monoclonal Antibody Reduces Influenza A Virus Transmission in Mice.” Antiviral Research 158: 244–254.
APA
Kolpe, A., Schepens, B., Ye, L., Staeheli, P., & Saelens, X. (2018). Passively transferred M2e-specific monoclonal antibody reduces influenza A virus transmission in mice. ANTIVIRAL RESEARCH, 158, 244–254.
Vancouver
1.
Kolpe A, Schepens B, Ye L, Staeheli P, Saelens X. Passively transferred M2e-specific monoclonal antibody reduces influenza A virus transmission in mice. ANTIVIRAL RESEARCH. 2018;158:244–54.
MLA
Kolpe, Annasaheb et al. “Passively Transferred M2e-specific Monoclonal Antibody Reduces Influenza A Virus Transmission in Mice.” ANTIVIRAL RESEARCH 158 (2018): 244–254. Print.
@article{8583879,
  abstract     = {Influenza represents a global public health threat. Currently available influenza vaccines are effective against strain-matched influenza A and B viruses but do not protect against novel pandemic viruses. Vaccine candidates that target conserved B or T cell epitopes of influenza viruses could circumvent this shortcoming. The conserved extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) of influenza A is an example of such a broadly protective vaccine candidate. Protection by M2e-based vaccine candidates largely depends on M2e-specific IgG antibodies. Here we show that the M2e-specific IgG2a monoclonal antibody 65 (MAb 65) can reduce influenza A/Udorn/72 (H3N2) and A/Hong Kong/68 (H3N2) virus plaque formation. This effect was not observed with other influenza A virus strains tested. We further show that passive transfer of MAb 65 to mice can reduce viral loads in the upper and lower airways, which results in reduced transmission of A/Udorn/72 and A/Hong Kong/68 viruses to cohoused, unimmunized contact mice. Virus restriction by passively transferred Mab 65 was significantly less pronounced in Fcgr1(-/-) Fcgr3(-/-) mutant mice compared with wild type controls, suggesting that in vivo protection provided by MAb 65 depends on Fc gamma receptor-mediated antibody effector mechanisms. We conclude that M2e-based antibody immune therapy has the potential to diminish influenza A virus replication in the immunized host as well as in exposed naive contacts.},
  author       = {Kolpe, Annasaheb and Schepens, Bert and Ye, Liang and Staeheli, Peter and Saelens, Xavier},
  issn         = {0166-3542},
  journal      = {ANTIVIRAL RESEARCH},
  keywords     = {Influenza A virus,Mouse transmission model,M2 ectodomain,Broadly protecting antibody,EXTRACELLULAR DOMAIN,MATRIX PROTEIN-2,M2 PROTEIN,HOUSEHOLD TRANSMISSION,AIRBORNE TRANSMISSION,IMMUNE-RESPONSES,MOUSE MODEL,H1N1 VIRUS,INFECTION,PROTECTION},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {244--254},
  title        = {Passively transferred M2e-specific monoclonal antibody reduces influenza A virus transmission in mice},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.antiviral.2018.08.017},
  volume       = {158},
  year         = {2018},
}

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