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Body size in the ant-associated isopod Platyarthrus hoffmannseggii is host-dependent

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Organization
Abstract
Many symbionts live in association with different species. It can be expected that these distinct hosts might have a different effect on key life-history traits of the associated symbionts. Here, we compared the key trait body size of the obligatorily ant-associated isopod Platyarthrus hoffmannseggii collected in nests of two types of sympatric ant hosts. This isopod species showed surprisingly large differences in body size depending on type of host ant, with the head width of females and males associated with organic mound building red wood ants (RWAs) being, respectively, 1.30 and 1.17 times larger than isopods sympatrically living in earth nests of Lasius flavus. There was also a higher proportion of females in many RWA nests, but this pattern was not consistent across all nests. Genetic analyses and aggression trials did not reveal cryptic groups specialized to different hosts. Therefore, we argue that the isopods exhibit size plasticity because of different host nest conditions. Absence of host aggression and optimal abiotic conditions in RWA nests might promote a larger isopod body size. Overall, this study shows that the association of a symbiont with different hosts might induce phenotypic plasticity in a symbiont key trait.
Keywords
ant guests, associates, ecotype, fitness, inquiline, isopoda, myrmecophile, symbiosis, FORMICA-RUFA GROUP, LIFE-HISTORY TRAITS, RED WOOD ANTS, TERRESTRIAL ISOPODS, HYMENOPTERA-FORMICIDAE, SEX-RATIO, STAPHYLINIDAE, TEMPERATURE, SPECIFICITY, COLEOPTERA

Citation

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MLA
Parmentier, Thomas, Ann Vanderheyden, Wouter Dekoninck, et al. “Body Size in the Ant-associated Isopod Platyarthrus Hoffmannseggii Is Host-dependent.” BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY 121.2 (2017): 305–311. Print.
APA
Parmentier, Thomas, Vanderheyden, A., Dekoninck, W., & Wenseleers, T. (2017). Body size in the ant-associated isopod Platyarthrus hoffmannseggii is host-dependent. BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, 121(2), 305–311.
Chicago author-date
Parmentier, Thomas, Ann Vanderheyden, Wouter Dekoninck, and Tom Wenseleers. 2017. “Body Size in the Ant-associated Isopod Platyarthrus Hoffmannseggii Is Host-dependent.” Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 121 (2): 305–311.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Parmentier, Thomas, Ann Vanderheyden, Wouter Dekoninck, and Tom Wenseleers. 2017. “Body Size in the Ant-associated Isopod Platyarthrus Hoffmannseggii Is Host-dependent.” Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 121 (2): 305–311.
Vancouver
1.
Parmentier T, Vanderheyden A, Dekoninck W, Wenseleers T. Body size in the ant-associated isopod Platyarthrus hoffmannseggii is host-dependent. BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY. 2017;121(2):305–11.
IEEE
[1]
T. Parmentier, A. Vanderheyden, W. Dekoninck, and T. Wenseleers, “Body size in the ant-associated isopod Platyarthrus hoffmannseggii is host-dependent,” BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY, vol. 121, no. 2, pp. 305–311, 2017.
@article{8583824,
  abstract     = {Many symbionts live in association with different species. It can be expected that these distinct hosts might have a different effect on key life-history traits of the associated symbionts. Here, we compared the key trait body size of the obligatorily ant-associated isopod Platyarthrus hoffmannseggii collected in nests of two types of sympatric ant hosts. This isopod species showed surprisingly large differences in body size depending on type of host ant, with the head width of females and males associated with organic mound building red wood ants (RWAs) being, respectively, 1.30 and 1.17 times larger than isopods sympatrically living in earth nests of Lasius flavus. There was also a higher proportion of females in many RWA nests, but this pattern was not consistent across all nests. Genetic analyses and aggression trials did not reveal cryptic groups specialized to different hosts. Therefore, we argue that the isopods exhibit size plasticity because of different host nest conditions. Absence of host aggression and optimal abiotic conditions in RWA nests might promote a larger isopod body size. Overall, this study shows that the association of a symbiont with different hosts might induce phenotypic plasticity in a symbiont key trait.},
  author       = {Parmentier, Thomas and Vanderheyden, Ann and Dekoninck, Wouter and Wenseleers, Tom},
  issn         = {0024-4066},
  journal      = {BIOLOGICAL JOURNAL OF THE LINNEAN SOCIETY},
  keywords     = {ant guests,associates,ecotype,fitness,inquiline,isopoda,myrmecophile,symbiosis,FORMICA-RUFA GROUP,LIFE-HISTORY TRAITS,RED WOOD ANTS,TERRESTRIAL ISOPODS,HYMENOPTERA-FORMICIDAE,SEX-RATIO,STAPHYLINIDAE,TEMPERATURE,SPECIFICITY,COLEOPTERA},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {305--311},
  title        = {Body size in the ant-associated isopod Platyarthrus hoffmannseggii is host-dependent},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/biolinnean/blw052},
  volume       = {121},
  year         = {2017},
}

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