Advanced search
1 file | 610.20 KB

Assessing the viability of a synthetic bacterial consortium on the in vitro gut host-microbe interface

Author
Organization
Abstract
The interplay between host and microbiota has been long recognized and extensively described. The mouth is similar to other sections of the gastrointestinal tract, as resident microbiota occurs and prevents colonisation by exogenous bacteria. Indeed, more than 600 species of bacteria are found in the oral cavity, and a single individual may carry around 100 different at any time. Oral bacteria possess the ability to adhere to the various niches in the oral ecosystem, thus becoming integrated within the resident microbial communities, and favouring growth and survival. However, the flow of bacteria into the gut during swallowing has been proposed to disturb the balance of the gut microbiota. In fact, oral administration of P. gingivalis shifted bacterial composition in the ilea! microflora. We used a synthetic community as a simplified representation of the natural oral ecosystem, to elucidate the survival and viability of oral bacteria subjected to simulated gastrointestinal transit conditions. Fourteen species were selected, subjected to in vitro salivary, gastric, and intestinal digestion processes, and presented to a multicompartment cell model containing Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cells to simulate the gut mucosal epithelium. This model served to unravel the impact of swallowed bacteria on cells involved in the enterohepatic circulation. Using synthetic communities allows for controllability and reproducibility. Thus, this methodology can be adapted to assess pathogen viability and subsequent inflammation-associated changes, colonization capacity of probiotic mixtures, and ultimately, potential bacterial impact on the presystemic circulation.
Keywords
Biochemistry, Issue 137, Oral microbiome, synthetic microbial community, in vitro models, gastrointestinal passage, health-associated bacteria, commensal bacteria, host-microbe interaction, gut epithelium, bacterial viability, bacterial adhesion, flow cytometry, ORAL MICROBIOME, CELL-LINES, ADHESION, CACO-2, MODELS, HEALTH, PLAQUE, MUCUS

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 610.20 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Calatayud Arroyo, Marta, Tom Van de Wiele, and Emma Hernandez Sanabria. 2018. “Assessing the Viability of a Synthetic Bacterial Consortium on the in Vitro Gut Host-microbe Interface.” Jove-journal of Visualized Experiments (137).
APA
Calatayud Arroyo, M., Van de Wiele, T., & Hernandez Sanabria, E. (2018). Assessing the viability of a synthetic bacterial consortium on the in vitro gut host-microbe interface. JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS, (137).
Vancouver
1.
Calatayud Arroyo M, Van de Wiele T, Hernandez Sanabria E. Assessing the viability of a synthetic bacterial consortium on the in vitro gut host-microbe interface. JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS. 2018;(137).
MLA
Calatayud Arroyo, Marta, Tom Van de Wiele, and Emma Hernandez Sanabria. “Assessing the Viability of a Synthetic Bacterial Consortium on the in Vitro Gut Host-microbe Interface.” JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS 137 (2018): n. pag. Print.
@article{8580533,
  abstract     = {The interplay between host and microbiota has been long recognized and extensively described. The mouth is similar to other sections of the gastrointestinal tract, as resident microbiota occurs and prevents colonisation by exogenous bacteria. Indeed, more than 600 species of bacteria are found in the oral cavity, and a single individual may carry around 100 different at any time. Oral bacteria possess the ability to adhere to the various niches in the oral ecosystem, thus becoming integrated within the resident microbial communities, and favouring growth and survival. However, the flow of bacteria into the gut during swallowing has been proposed to disturb the balance of the gut microbiota. In fact, oral administration of P. gingivalis shifted bacterial composition in the ilea! microflora. We used a synthetic community as a simplified representation of the natural oral ecosystem, to elucidate the survival and viability of oral bacteria subjected to simulated gastrointestinal transit conditions. Fourteen species were selected, subjected to in vitro salivary, gastric, and intestinal digestion processes, and presented to a multicompartment cell model containing Caco-2 and HT29-MTX cells to simulate the gut mucosal epithelium. This model served to unravel the impact of swallowed bacteria on cells involved in the enterohepatic circulation. Using synthetic communities allows for controllability and reproducibility. Thus, this methodology can be adapted to assess pathogen viability and subsequent inflammation-associated changes, colonization capacity of probiotic mixtures, and ultimately, potential bacterial impact on the presystemic circulation.},
  articleno    = {e57699},
  author       = {Calatayud Arroyo, Marta and Van de Wiele, Tom and Hernandez Sanabria, Emma},
  issn         = {1940-087X},
  journal      = {JOVE-JOURNAL OF VISUALIZED EXPERIMENTS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {137},
  pages        = {8},
  title        = {Assessing the viability of a synthetic bacterial consortium on the in vitro gut host-microbe interface},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3791/57699},
  year         = {2018},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: