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Analysis of failures after the Bristow-Latarjet procedure for recurrent shoulder instability

(2019) INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS. 43(8). p.1899-1907
Author
Organization
Abstract
Purpose: Despite good clinical results and low recurrence rates, post-operative complications of coracoid process transfer procedures are not well understood. This study aims to evaluate the underlying failure mechanism in cases requiring major open revision surgery after prior Bristow or Latarjet stabilization. Methods: Between January 2006 and January 2017, 26 patients underwent major open revision after primary Bristow or Latarjet procedure. Clinical notes and radiographic images were retrospectively reviewed for all cases to determine underlying pathology. Choice of treatment and clinical and radiographic outcome were similarly reported for all cases. Results: The underlying failure mechanism was associated with non-union in 42.3%, resorption in 23.1%, graft malpositioning in 15.4%, and trauma or graft fracture in 19.2% of cases. Although none of the patients reported any dislocations, mean subjective shoulder score was 60.2% and WOSI scores averaged 709.3 points at final follow-up. Radiographic signs of deteriorating degenerative arthritis were seen in 34.6%. Conclusion: Graft non-union resulting in recurrent instability was the main indication for open revision surgery after Bristow or Latarjet procedure, followed by resorption, malpositioning, and graft fracture in this retrospective case series. Revision surgery consisted of a structural iliac crest bone graft in the majority of cases. Clinical and radiographic outcomes are predictably variable in this population of multioperated patients.
Keywords
Glenohumeral instability, Bristow-Latarjet, Coracoid transfer, Complications, Revision, ARTHROSCOPIC CORACOID TRANSFER, ANTERIOR INSTABILITY, DISLOCATION, COMPLICATIONS, RECONSTRUCTION, STABILIZATION, STABILITY

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MLA
Willemot, Laurent, et al. “Analysis of Failures after the Bristow-Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Shoulder Instability.” INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS, vol. 43, no. 8, 2019, pp. 1899–907.
APA
Willemot, L., De Boey, S., Van Tongel, A., Declercq, G., De Wilde, L., & Verborgt, O. (2019). Analysis of failures after the Bristow-Latarjet procedure for recurrent shoulder instability. INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS, 43(8), 1899–1907.
Chicago author-date
Willemot, Laurent, Sara De Boey, Alexander Van Tongel, Geert Declercq, Lieven De Wilde, and Olivier Verborgt. 2019. “Analysis of Failures after the Bristow-Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Shoulder Instability.” INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS 43 (8): 1899–1907.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Willemot, Laurent, Sara De Boey, Alexander Van Tongel, Geert Declercq, Lieven De Wilde, and Olivier Verborgt. 2019. “Analysis of Failures after the Bristow-Latarjet Procedure for Recurrent Shoulder Instability.” INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS 43 (8): 1899–1907.
Vancouver
1.
Willemot L, De Boey S, Van Tongel A, Declercq G, De Wilde L, Verborgt O. Analysis of failures after the Bristow-Latarjet procedure for recurrent shoulder instability. INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS. 2019;43(8):1899–907.
IEEE
[1]
L. Willemot, S. De Boey, A. Van Tongel, G. Declercq, L. De Wilde, and O. Verborgt, “Analysis of failures after the Bristow-Latarjet procedure for recurrent shoulder instability,” INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS, vol. 43, no. 8, pp. 1899–1907, 2019.
@article{8579722,
  abstract     = {Purpose: Despite good clinical results and low recurrence rates, post-operative complications of coracoid process transfer procedures are not well understood. This study aims to evaluate the underlying failure mechanism in cases requiring major open revision surgery after prior Bristow or Latarjet stabilization.
Methods: Between January 2006 and January 2017, 26 patients underwent major open revision after primary Bristow or Latarjet procedure. Clinical notes and radiographic images were retrospectively reviewed for all cases to determine underlying pathology. Choice of treatment and clinical and radiographic outcome were similarly reported for all cases.
Results: The underlying failure mechanism was associated with non-union in 42.3%, resorption in 23.1%, graft malpositioning in 15.4%, and trauma or graft fracture in 19.2% of cases. Although none of the patients reported any dislocations, mean subjective shoulder score was 60.2% and WOSI scores averaged 709.3 points at final follow-up. Radiographic signs of deteriorating degenerative arthritis were seen in 34.6%.
Conclusion: Graft non-union resulting in recurrent instability was the main indication for open revision surgery after Bristow or Latarjet procedure, followed by resorption, malpositioning, and graft fracture in this retrospective case series. Revision surgery consisted of a structural iliac crest bone graft in the majority of cases. Clinical and radiographic outcomes are predictably variable in this population of multioperated patients.},
  author       = {Willemot, Laurent and De Boey, Sara and Van Tongel, Alexander and Declercq, Geert and De Wilde, Lieven and Verborgt, Olivier},
  issn         = {0341-2695},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL ORTHOPAEDICS},
  keywords     = {Glenohumeral instability,Bristow-Latarjet,Coracoid transfer,Complications,Revision,ARTHROSCOPIC CORACOID TRANSFER,ANTERIOR INSTABILITY,DISLOCATION,COMPLICATIONS,RECONSTRUCTION,STABILIZATION,STABILITY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {1899--1907},
  title        = {Analysis of failures after the Bristow-Latarjet procedure for recurrent shoulder instability},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-018-4105-6},
  volume       = {43},
  year         = {2019},
}

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