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Pharmacokinetics of β-alanine using different dosing strategies

Jan Stautemas (UGent) , Inge Everaert (UGent) , Filip Lefevere (UGent) and Wim Derave (UGent)
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Abstract
Introduction: The ergogenic response following long-term ingestion of beta-alanine shows a high inter-individual variation. It is hypothesized that this variation is partially caused by a variable pharmacokinetic response induced by inferior dosing strategies. At this point most supplements are either taken in a fixed amount (x g), as is the case with beta-alanine, or relative to body weight (x g per kg BW), but there is currently neither consensus nor a scientific rationale on why these or other dosing strategies should be used. The aim of this study is to objectify and understand the variation in plasma pharmacokinetics of a single oral b-alanine dose supplemented as either a fixed or a weight-relative dose (WRD) in an anthropometric diverse sample. Methods: An anthropometric diverse sample ingested a fixed dose (1,400mg) (n = 28) and a WRD of beta-alanine (10 mg/kg BW) (n = 34) on separate occasions. Blood samples were taken before and at nine time points (up to 4 h) after beta-alanine ingestion in order to establish a pharmacokinetic profile. Incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was calculated by the trapezoidal rule. Plasma beta-alanine was quantified using HPLC-fluorescence. Results: The variation coefficient (CV%) of the iAUC was 35.0% following ingestion of 1,400mg b-alanine. Body weight explained 30.1% of the variance and was negatively correlated to iAUC (r = -0.549; p = 0.003). Interestingly, the CV% did not decrease with WRD (33.2%) and body weight was positively correlated to iAUC in response to the WRD (r = 0.488; p = 0.003). Conclusion: Both dosing strategies evoked an equally high inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetic plasma profile. Strikingly, while body weight explained a relevant part of the variation observed following a fixed dose, correction for body weight did not improve the homogeneity in b-alanine plasma response. We suggest to put more effort into the optimization of easy applicable and scientifically justified personalized dosing strategies.
Keywords
beta-alanine, sports supplements, pharmacokinetics, personalized nutrition, carnosine, SKELETAL-MUSCLE, CARNOSINE, SUPPLEMENTATION, EXERCISE, PERFORMANCE, HISTIDINE, CAPACITY

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Stautemas, Jan, Inge Everaert, Filip Lefevere, and Wim Derave. 2018. “Pharmacokinetics of Β-alanine Using Different Dosing Strategies.” Frontiers in Nutrition 5.
APA
Stautemas, J., Everaert, I., Lefevere, F., & Derave, W. (2018). Pharmacokinetics of β-alanine using different dosing strategies. FRONTIERS IN NUTRITION, 5.
Vancouver
1.
Stautemas J, Everaert I, Lefevere F, Derave W. Pharmacokinetics of β-alanine using different dosing strategies. FRONTIERS IN NUTRITION. 2018;5.
MLA
Stautemas, Jan et al. “Pharmacokinetics of Β-alanine Using Different Dosing Strategies.” FRONTIERS IN NUTRITION 5 (2018): n. pag. Print.
@article{8576978,
  abstract     = {Introduction: The ergogenic response following long-term ingestion of beta-alanine shows a high inter-individual variation. It is hypothesized that this variation is partially caused by a variable pharmacokinetic response induced by inferior dosing strategies. At this point most supplements are either taken in a fixed amount (x g), as is the case with beta-alanine, or relative to body weight (x g per kg BW), but there is currently neither consensus nor a scientific rationale on why these or other dosing strategies should be used. The aim of this study is to objectify and understand the variation in plasma pharmacokinetics of a single oral b-alanine dose supplemented as either a fixed or a weight-relative dose (WRD) in an anthropometric diverse sample. 
Methods: An anthropometric diverse sample ingested a fixed dose (1,400mg) (n = 28) and a WRD of beta-alanine (10 mg/kg BW) (n = 34) on separate occasions. Blood samples were taken before and at nine time points (up to 4 h) after beta-alanine ingestion in order to establish a pharmacokinetic profile. Incremental area under the curve (iAUC) was calculated by the trapezoidal rule. Plasma beta-alanine was quantified using HPLC-fluorescence. 
Results: The variation coefficient (CV\%) of the iAUC was 35.0\% following ingestion of 1,400mg b-alanine. Body weight explained 30.1\% of the variance and was negatively correlated to iAUC (r = -0.549; p = 0.003). Interestingly, the CV\% did not decrease with WRD (33.2\%) and body weight was positively correlated to iAUC in response to the WRD (r = 0.488; p = 0.003). 
Conclusion: Both dosing strategies evoked an equally high inter-individual variability in pharmacokinetic plasma profile. Strikingly, while body weight explained a relevant part of the variation observed following a fixed dose, correction for body weight did not improve the homogeneity in b-alanine plasma response. We suggest to put more effort into the optimization of easy applicable and scientifically justified personalized dosing strategies.},
  articleno    = {70},
  author       = {Stautemas, Jan and Everaert, Inge and Lefevere, Filip and Derave, Wim},
  issn         = {2296-861X},
  journal      = {FRONTIERS IN NUTRITION},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {7},
  title        = {Pharmacokinetics of \ensuremath{\beta}-alanine using different dosing strategies},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fnut.2018.00070},
  volume       = {5},
  year         = {2018},
}

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