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Phonological short-term memory : a predictor of phrasal uptake?

Griet Boone (UGent) and June Eyckmans (UGent)
(2018)
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Abstract
Phonological short-term memory: a predictor of phraseological knowledge? It has been widely attested that language learners’ acquisition of formulaic sequences shows large variation. Some learners maintain their artificial textbook-like proficiency, whereas others manage to sound native-like (e.g. Dörnyei et al., 2004; Schmitt, 2004). There is a growing consensus among scholars that working memory should be seen as a central component of foreign language aptitude, an individual factor in predicting second language success (e.g. Dörnyei, 2005; Singleton, 2017; Wen et al., 2017). Research has demonstrated that especially phonological short-term memory (PSTM) plays a significant role in the acquisition of L2 vocabulary and L2 grammar (e.g. Martin & Ellis, 2012; Speciale et al., 2004; Wen, 2016). The present study aims to investigate if there is a significant relationship between learners’ PSTM and their uptake of new phrases. Therefore, the PSTM of 20 Dutch-speaking university students of Applied Linguistics with German as a major language was measured by a serial nonword recognition task, based on Gathercole (2001). Twenty-two phrases were selected as target items for classroom-based learning and a pretest, posttest and two delayed postttests were carried out. Results show that the scores of PSTM were significantly correlated with scores for the pretest, but not with the posttests, and that there was no difference in phraseological uptake between students with a high or low PSTM in the posttests. These data suggest that although PSTM seems to be correlated with phraseological knowledge, the difference between students with a high and low phonological memory doesn’t affect language learning in a classroom situation.
Keywords
formulaic sequences, collocations, foreign language acquisition, language aptitude, phonological short-term memory

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MLA
Boone, Griet, and June Eyckmans. “Phonological Short-term Memory : a Predictor of Phrasal Uptake?” 2018. Print.
APA
Boone, G., & Eyckmans, J. (2018). Phonological short-term memory : a predictor of phrasal uptake? Presented at the Individual differences in second language learning and teaching II: The individual and the context.
Chicago author-date
Boone, Griet, and June Eyckmans. 2018. “Phonological Short-term Memory : a Predictor of Phrasal Uptake?” In .
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Boone, Griet, and June Eyckmans. 2018. “Phonological Short-term Memory : a Predictor of Phrasal Uptake?” In .
Vancouver
1.
Boone G, Eyckmans J. Phonological short-term memory : a predictor of phrasal uptake? 2018.
IEEE
[1]
G. Boone and J. Eyckmans, “Phonological short-term memory : a predictor of phrasal uptake?,” presented at the Individual differences in second language learning and teaching II: The individual and the context, Konin, 2018.
@inproceedings{8576917,
  abstract     = {{Phonological short-term memory: a predictor of phraseological knowledge?
It has been widely attested that language learners’ acquisition of formulaic sequences shows large variation.
Some learners maintain their artificial textbook-like proficiency, whereas others manage to sound native-like (e.g.
Dörnyei et al., 2004; Schmitt, 2004). There is a growing consensus among scholars that working memory should
be seen as a central component of foreign language aptitude, an individual factor in predicting second language
success (e.g. Dörnyei, 2005; Singleton, 2017; Wen et al., 2017). Research has demonstrated that especially
phonological short-term memory (PSTM) plays a significant role in the acquisition of L2 vocabulary and L2
grammar (e.g. Martin & Ellis, 2012; Speciale et al., 2004; Wen, 2016). The present study aims to investigate if
there is a significant relationship between learners’ PSTM and their uptake of new phrases. Therefore, the PSTM
of 20 Dutch-speaking university students of Applied Linguistics with German as a major language was measured
by a serial nonword recognition task, based on Gathercole (2001). Twenty-two phrases were selected as target
items for classroom-based learning and a pretest, posttest and two delayed postttests were carried out.
Results show that the scores of PSTM were significantly correlated with scores for the pretest, but not with the
posttests, and that there was no difference in phraseological uptake between students with a high or low PSTM in
the posttests. These data suggest that although PSTM seems to be correlated with phraseological knowledge,
the difference between students with a high and low phonological memory doesn’t affect language learning in a
classroom situation.}},
  author       = {{Boone, Griet and Eyckmans, June}},
  keywords     = {{formulaic sequences,collocations,foreign language acquisition,language aptitude,phonological short-term memory}},
  language     = {{und}},
  location     = {{Konin}},
  title        = {{Phonological short-term memory : a predictor of phrasal uptake?}},
  year         = {{2018}},
}