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Infrared spectroscopy as a novel tool to diagnose onychomycosis

(2019) BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY. 180(3). p.637-646
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Organization
Abstract
Background: The determination of causative organisms of onychomycosis is still not optimal. There remains a need for a cheap, fast and easy-to-perform diagnostic tool with a high capacity to distinguish between organisms. Objectives: To determine whether attenuated total-reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy can detect and differentiate causative agents in culture-based, ex vivo nail and in vivo nail models. Methods: A methodological study was conducted. Both the ex vivo nail model and in vivo pilot study were carried out in an academic university hospital. Results: Analysis of cultured fungi revealed spectral differences for dermatophytes (1692-1606 and 1044-1004 cm(-1)) and nondermatophytes and yeasts (973-937 cm(-1)), confirmed by dendrograms showing an excellent separation between samples from different genera or species. Exploration of dermatophytes, nondermatophytes and yeasts growing on ex vivo nails exposed prominent differences from 1200 to 900 cm(-1). Prediction models resulted in a 969% accurate classification of uninfected nails and nails infected with dermatophytes, nondermatophytes and yeasts. Overall correct classification rates of 910%, 977% and 986% were obtained for discrimination between dermatophyte, nondermatophyte and yeast genera or species, respectively. Spectra of in vivo infected and uninfected nails also revealed distinct spectral differences (3000-2811 cm(-1), 1043-950 cm(-1) and 1676-1553 cm(-1)), illustrated by two main clusters (uninfected vs. infected) on a dendrogram. Conclusions: Our data suggest that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy may be a promising, fast and accurate method to determine onychomycosis, including identification of the causative organism, bypassing the need for lengthy fungal cultures.
Keywords
FTIR SPECTROSCOPY, DIFFERENTIATION, EPIDEMIOLOGY, SPECTROMETRY, PREVALENCE, PROTEINS

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MLA
De Bruyne, Sander, et al. “Infrared Spectroscopy as a Novel Tool to Diagnose Onychomycosis.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, vol. 180, no. 3, 2019, pp. 637–46.
APA
De Bruyne, S., Speeckaert, R., Boelens, J., Hayette, M.-P., Speeckaert, M., & Delanghe, J. (2019). Infrared spectroscopy as a novel tool to diagnose onychomycosis. BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, 180(3), 637–646.
Chicago author-date
De Bruyne, Sander, Reinhart Speeckaert, Jerina Boelens, M-P Hayette, Marijn Speeckaert, and Joris Delanghe. 2019. “Infrared Spectroscopy as a Novel Tool to Diagnose Onychomycosis.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY 180 (3): 637–46.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
De Bruyne, Sander, Reinhart Speeckaert, Jerina Boelens, M-P Hayette, Marijn Speeckaert, and Joris Delanghe. 2019. “Infrared Spectroscopy as a Novel Tool to Diagnose Onychomycosis.” BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY 180 (3): 637–646.
Vancouver
1.
De Bruyne S, Speeckaert R, Boelens J, Hayette M-P, Speeckaert M, Delanghe J. Infrared spectroscopy as a novel tool to diagnose onychomycosis. BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY. 2019;180(3):637–46.
IEEE
[1]
S. De Bruyne, R. Speeckaert, J. Boelens, M.-P. Hayette, M. Speeckaert, and J. Delanghe, “Infrared spectroscopy as a novel tool to diagnose onychomycosis,” BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY, vol. 180, no. 3, pp. 637–646, 2019.
@article{8576069,
  abstract     = {Background: The determination of causative organisms of onychomycosis is still not optimal. There remains a need for a cheap, fast and easy-to-perform diagnostic tool with a high capacity to distinguish between organisms.
Objectives: To determine whether attenuated total-reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy can detect and differentiate causative agents in culture-based, ex vivo nail and in vivo nail models.
Methods: A methodological study was conducted. Both the ex vivo nail model and in vivo pilot study were carried out in an academic university hospital.
Results: Analysis of cultured fungi revealed spectral differences for dermatophytes (1692-1606 and 1044-1004 cm(-1)) and nondermatophytes and yeasts (973-937 cm(-1)), confirmed by dendrograms showing an excellent separation between samples from different genera or species. Exploration of dermatophytes, nondermatophytes and yeasts growing on ex vivo nails exposed prominent differences from 1200 to 900 cm(-1). Prediction models resulted in a 969% accurate classification of uninfected nails and nails infected with dermatophytes, nondermatophytes and yeasts. Overall correct classification rates of 910%, 977% and 986% were obtained for discrimination between dermatophyte, nondermatophyte and yeast genera or species, respectively. Spectra of in vivo infected and uninfected nails also revealed distinct spectral differences (3000-2811 cm(-1), 1043-950 cm(-1) and 1676-1553 cm(-1)), illustrated by two main clusters (uninfected vs. infected) on a dendrogram.
Conclusions: Our data suggest that ATR-FTIR spectroscopy may be a promising, fast and accurate method to determine onychomycosis, including identification of the causative organism, bypassing the need for lengthy fungal cultures.},
  author       = {De Bruyne, Sander and Speeckaert, Reinhart and Boelens, Jerina and Hayette, M-P and Speeckaert, Marijn and Delanghe, Joris},
  issn         = {0007-0963},
  journal      = {BRITISH JOURNAL OF DERMATOLOGY},
  keywords     = {FTIR SPECTROSCOPY,DIFFERENTIATION,EPIDEMIOLOGY,SPECTROMETRY,PREVALENCE,PROTEINS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {637--646},
  title        = {Infrared spectroscopy as a novel tool to diagnose onychomycosis},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bjd.17199},
  volume       = {180},
  year         = {2019},
}

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