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To be yourself or to be your ideal self? Outcomes of potential applicants' actual and ideal self-congruity perceptions

Lien Wille (UGent) , Greet Van Hoye (UGent) , Bert Weijters (UGent) , Deva Rangarajan and Marieke Carpentier (UGent)
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Abstract
Recruitment research on person–organization fit has typically focused on organizations’ fit with potential applicants’ actual self, not considering other possible self-images. Based on image congruity theory, we investigate how actual and ideal self-congruity relate to application intentions and intentions to spread word-of-mouth. In a first study, conducted in Belgium, actual and ideal self-congruity related positively to both outcomes. The relation with application intentions was equally positive for actual and ideal self-congruity. Ideal selfcongruity showed a stronger positive relation with word-of-mouth intentions. A second study replicated these findings in the United States and tested for social adjustment concern (need to impress others) as a moderator. As social adjustment concern increased, relations of both outcomes with ideal (actual) self-congruity were stronger (weaker).
Keywords
applicant attraction, actual self-congruity, ideal self-congruity, application intentions, word-of-mouth

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Chicago
Wille, Lien, Greet Van Hoye, Bert Weijters, Deva Rangarajan, and Marieke Carpentier. 2018. “To Be Yourself or to Be Your Ideal Self? Outcomes of Potential Applicants’ Actual and Ideal Self-congruity Perceptions.” Journal of Personnel Psychology 17 (3): 107–119.
APA
Wille, L., Van Hoye, G., Weijters, B., Rangarajan, D., & Carpentier, M. (2018). To be yourself or to be your ideal self? Outcomes of potential applicants’ actual and ideal self-congruity perceptions. JOURNAL OF PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY, 17(3), 107–119.
Vancouver
1.
Wille L, Van Hoye G, Weijters B, Rangarajan D, Carpentier M. To be yourself or to be your ideal self? Outcomes of potential applicants’ actual and ideal self-congruity perceptions. JOURNAL OF PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY. Hogrefe Publishing Group; 2018;17(3):107–19.
MLA
Wille, Lien et al. “To Be Yourself or to Be Your Ideal Self? Outcomes of Potential Applicants’ Actual and Ideal Self-congruity Perceptions.” JOURNAL OF PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY 17.3 (2018): 107–119. Print.
@article{8574614,
  abstract     = {Recruitment research on person–organization fit has typically focused on organizations’ fit with potential applicants’ actual self, not considering other possible self-images. Based on image congruity theory, we investigate how actual and ideal self-congruity relate to application intentions and intentions to spread word-of-mouth. In a first study, conducted in Belgium, actual and ideal self-congruity related positively to both outcomes. The relation with application intentions was equally positive for actual and ideal self-congruity. Ideal selfcongruity showed a stronger positive relation with word-of-mouth intentions. A second study replicated these findings in the United States and tested for social adjustment concern (need to impress others) as a moderator. As social adjustment concern increased, relations of both outcomes with ideal (actual) self-congruity were stronger (weaker).},
  author       = {Wille, Lien and Van Hoye, Greet and Weijters, Bert and Rangarajan, Deva and Carpentier, Marieke},
  issn         = {1866-5888},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF PERSONNEL PSYCHOLOGY},
  keywords     = {applicant attraction,actual self-congruity,ideal self-congruity,application intentions,word-of-mouth},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {107--119},
  publisher    = {Hogrefe Publishing Group},
  title        = {To be yourself or to be your ideal self? Outcomes of potential applicants' actual and ideal self-congruity perceptions},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1866-5888/a000213},
  volume       = {17},
  year         = {2018},
}

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