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Changes in children’s television and computer time according to parental education, parental income and ethnicity : a 6-year longitudinal EYHS study

(2018) PLOS ONE. 13(9).
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Organization
Abstract
Objectives : To investigate changes in children's television and computer time according to three socioeconomic status (SES) indicators. Design : Prospective cohort study. Methods : Data were drawn from the European Youth Heart Study and included longitudinal data collected in 1997 and 2003 in Denmark. Television and computer time were self-reported by children. Parental education, income and ethnicity were parent-reported. Baseline data were available for 549 children (47.0% boys, 9.6 years). Generalized linear mixed models analyzed whether changes in television and computer time from baseline to follow-up differed according to the SES-indicators. Result : TV viewing time increased with 25% over time (ExpB = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.04-1.50). At both time points, children with two higher educated parents viewed 25% less hours of television than children with no higher educated parents (ExpB = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.60-0.94) and one higher educated parent (ExpB = 0.75, 95% CI = 0.59-0.97). Among children with no higher educated parents the odds of being in a higher category of computer time increased with 80% over time (OR = 1.80, 95% CI = 1.24-2.60). Among children with two higher educated parents the odds of being in a higher category of computer time decreased with 45% over time (OR = 0.55, 95% CI = 0.32-0.94). The association with ethnicity showed that white children had 42% lower odds (OR = 0.58; 95% CI = 0.34-1.00) of being in a higher category of computer time than non-white children. No significant associations were found for parental income. Conclusions : The most important SES measure of screen-based behaviors in children was parental education. Ethnicity was only associated with computer time. Financial resources were less relevant for changes in television viewing and computer use.
Keywords
physical activity & health, SEDENTARY BEHAVIOR, PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, SOCIOECONOMIC POSITION, HEALTH OUTCOMES, YOUTH, ASSOCIATIONS, ADOLESCENTS, ADULTS

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Citation

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Chicago
De Craemer, Marieke, Maïté Verloigne, Ariane Ghekiere, Anne Loyen, Patricia Dargent-Molina, Johannes Brug, Nanna Lien, et al. 2018. “Changes in Children’s Television and Computer Time According to Parental Education, Parental Income and Ethnicity : a 6-year Longitudinal EYHS Study.” Plos One 13 (9).
APA
De Craemer, M., Verloigne, M., Ghekiere, A., Loyen, A., Dargent-Molina, P., Brug, J., Lien, N., et al. (2018). Changes in children’s television and computer time according to parental education, parental income and ethnicity : a 6-year longitudinal EYHS study. PLOS ONE, 13(9).
Vancouver
1.
De Craemer M, Verloigne M, Ghekiere A, Loyen A, Dargent-Molina P, Brug J, et al. Changes in children’s television and computer time according to parental education, parental income and ethnicity : a 6-year longitudinal EYHS study. PLOS ONE. 2018;13(9).
MLA
De Craemer, Marieke, Maïté Verloigne, Ariane Ghekiere, et al. “Changes in Children’s Television and Computer Time According to Parental Education, Parental Income and Ethnicity : a 6-year Longitudinal EYHS Study.” PLOS ONE 13.9 (2018): n. pag. Print.
@article{8574158,
  abstract     = {Objectives : To investigate changes in children's television and computer time according to three socioeconomic status (SES) indicators. 
Design : Prospective cohort study. 
Methods : Data were drawn from the European Youth Heart Study and included longitudinal data collected in 1997 and 2003 in Denmark. Television and computer time were self-reported by children. Parental education, income and ethnicity were parent-reported. Baseline data were available for 549 children (47.0\% boys, 9.6 years). Generalized linear mixed models analyzed whether changes in television and computer time from baseline to follow-up differed according to the SES-indicators. 
Result : TV viewing time increased with 25\% over time (ExpB = 1.25, 95\% CI = 1.04-1.50). At both time points, children with two higher educated parents viewed 25\% less hours of television than children with no higher educated parents (ExpB = 0.75, 95\% CI = 0.60-0.94) and one higher educated parent (ExpB = 0.75, 95\% CI = 0.59-0.97). Among children with no higher educated parents the odds of being in a higher category of computer time increased with 80\% over time (OR = 1.80, 95\% CI = 1.24-2.60). Among children with two higher educated parents the odds of being in a higher category of computer time decreased with 45\% over time (OR = 0.55, 95\% CI = 0.32-0.94). The association with ethnicity showed that white children had 42\% lower odds (OR = 0.58; 95\% CI = 0.34-1.00) of being in a higher category of computer time than non-white children. No significant associations were found for parental income. 
Conclusions : The most important SES measure of screen-based behaviors in children was parental education. Ethnicity was only associated with computer time. Financial resources were less relevant for changes in television viewing and computer use.},
  articleno    = {e0203592},
  author       = {De Craemer, Marieke and Verloigne, Ma{\"i}t{\'e} and Ghekiere, Ariane and Loyen, Anne and Dargent-Molina, Patricia and Brug, Johannes and Lien, Nanna and Froberg, Karsten and Wedderkopp, Niels and Chastin, Sebastien and Cardon, Greet and Van Cauwenberg, Jelle},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {13},
  title        = {Changes in children{\textquoteright}s television and computer time according to parental education, parental income and ethnicity : a 6-year longitudinal EYHS study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0203592},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2018},
}

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