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The future of age estimation : living up to the ethical demands?

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Abstract
With increasing migration, forensic age estimation is of particular interest to authorities and the scientific community. However, legislation on age estimation differs among countries and consequently a wide variety of approaches exists. Moreover, age estimation is a multidisciplinary issue, involving politicians, police, lawyers, health care professionals, and officiaries. All of these groups have expressed their opinions and judgement about how age estimation should be performed. As a response, researchers keep striving to ameliorate age estimation procedures. The chronological age can be estimated from biological age, either skeletal or dental, with the responsibility being that of specialised radiologists, anthropologists and dentists. Furthermore, it is suggested that the chronological age can be estimated from psychological maturity, which falls under the responsibility of specialised social workers and psychologists. Starting from illustrative cases, the current presentation will reflect on current practices and new developments in age estimation, and how they live up to (or undermine) current ethical demands.
Keywords
Age estimation, adolescent, subadult, ethics, future developments

Citation

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Chicago
De Tobel, Jannick, Michiel de Haas, Mayonne van Wijk, Inès Phlypo, Koenraad Verstraete, and Patrick Thevissen. 2018. “The Future of Age Estimation : Living up to the Ethical Demands?” In The Importance of Dental Ethics and Law, Abstracts. International Dental Ethics and Law Society (IDEALS).
APA
De Tobel, J., de Haas, M., van Wijk, M., Phlypo, I., Verstraete, K., & Thevissen, P. (2018). The future of age estimation : living up to the ethical demands? The importance of dental ethics and law, Abstracts. Presented at the The importance of dental ethics and law, International Dental Ethics and Law Society (IDEALS).
Vancouver
1.
De Tobel J, de Haas M, van Wijk M, Phlypo I, Verstraete K, Thevissen P. The future of age estimation : living up to the ethical demands? The importance of dental ethics and law, Abstracts. International Dental Ethics and Law Society (IDEALS); 2018.
MLA
De Tobel, Jannick, Michiel de Haas, Mayonne van Wijk, et al. “The Future of Age Estimation : Living up to the Ethical Demands?” The Importance of Dental Ethics and Law, Abstracts. International Dental Ethics and Law Society (IDEALS), 2018. Print.
@inproceedings{8571848,
  abstract     = {With increasing migration, forensic age estimation is of particular interest to authorities and the scientific community. However, legislation on age estimation differs among countries and consequently a wide variety of approaches exists. Moreover, age estimation is a multidisciplinary issue, involving politicians, police, lawyers, health care professionals, and officiaries. All of these groups have expressed their opinions and judgement about how age estimation should be performed. As a response, researchers keep striving to ameliorate age estimation procedures. 
The chronological age can be estimated from biological age, either skeletal or dental, with the responsibility being that of specialised radiologists, anthropologists and dentists. Furthermore, it is suggested that the chronological age can be estimated from psychological maturity, which falls under the responsibility of specialised social workers and psychologists.
Starting from illustrative cases, the current presentation will reflect on current practices and new developments in age estimation, and how they live up to (or undermine) current ethical demands.},
  author       = {De Tobel, Jannick and de Haas, Michiel and van Wijk, Mayonne and Phlypo, In{\`e}s and Verstraete, Koenraad and Thevissen, Patrick},
  booktitle    = {The importance of dental ethics and law, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Amsterdam, The Netherlands},
  publisher    = {International Dental Ethics and Law Society (IDEALS)},
  title        = {The future of age estimation : living up to the ethical demands?},
  year         = {2018},
}