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Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence

(2018) ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL. 120. p.456-463
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Abstract
Background: The effects of residential landscape, i.e., land use and traffic, on psychosocial stress in children are unknown, even though childhood stress might negatively affect normal development. In a longitudinal study, we investigate whether the residential landscape predicts childhood psychosocial stress and whether associations are independent of noise and air pollution. Methods: Belgian children aged 6.7-12.2 (N = 172, 50.9% boys) were followed for three years (2012-2015). Information on stress was obtained using standardized behavioral and emotional questionnaires and by a measure of hair cortisol. Residential landscape, including natural, agricultural, industrial, residential areas, and traffic, in a 100-m to 5-km radius around each child's home was characterized. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between psychosocial stress and the residential landscape were studied using linear regression and mixed models, while adjusting for age, sex, and parental socioeconomic status. Results: Natural landscapes were positively associated with better emotional status (increased happiness and lower sadness, anxiousness, and total negative emotions, beta = 0.14-0.17, 95% CI = 0.01-0.30). Similarly, we observed an inverse association between residential and traffic density with hyperactivity problems (beta = 0.13-0.18, 95% CI = 0.01-0.34). In longitudinal analyses, industrial area was a predictor of increases in negative emotions, while a natural landscape was for increases in happiness. Only the effect of natural landscape was partly explained by residential noise. Conclusion: Residential greenness in proximity to a child's residence might result in a better childhood emotional status, whereas poorer emotional status and behavioral problems (hyperactivity problems) were seen with residential and industrial areas and increased traffic density in proximity to a child's home.
Keywords
Residential landscape, Green space, Psychosocial stress, Children, Adolescents, NEIGHBORHOOD GREEN SPACE, DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, BEHAVIORAL-PROBLEMS, AIR-POLLUTION, HEALTH, EXPOSURE, PARTICIPATION, COMMUNITIES, DISEASE, OBESITY

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MLA
van Aart, Carola, et al. “Residential Landscape as a Predictor of Psychosocial Stress in the Life Course from Childhood to Adolescence.” ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, vol. 120, 2018, pp. 456–63, doi:10.1016/j.envint.2018.08.028.
APA
van Aart, C., Michels, N., Sioen, I., De Decker, A., Bijnens, E. M., Janssen, B. G., … Nawrot, T. S. (2018). Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence. ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 120, 456–463. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.08.028
Chicago author-date
Aart, Carola van, Nathalie Michels, Isabelle Sioen, Annelies De Decker, Esmee M Bijnens, Bram G Janssen, Stefaan De Henauw, and Tim S Nawrot. 2018. “Residential Landscape as a Predictor of Psychosocial Stress in the Life Course from Childhood to Adolescence.” ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL 120: 456–63. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.08.028.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
van Aart, Carola, Nathalie Michels, Isabelle Sioen, Annelies De Decker, Esmee M Bijnens, Bram G Janssen, Stefaan De Henauw, and Tim S Nawrot. 2018. “Residential Landscape as a Predictor of Psychosocial Stress in the Life Course from Childhood to Adolescence.” ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL 120: 456–463. doi:10.1016/j.envint.2018.08.028.
Vancouver
1.
van Aart C, Michels N, Sioen I, De Decker A, Bijnens EM, Janssen BG, et al. Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence. ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL. 2018;120:456–63.
IEEE
[1]
C. van Aart et al., “Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence,” ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, vol. 120, pp. 456–463, 2018.
@article{8571669,
  abstract     = {{Background: The effects of residential landscape, i.e., land use and traffic, on psychosocial stress in children are unknown, even though childhood stress might negatively affect normal development. In a longitudinal study, we investigate whether the residential landscape predicts childhood psychosocial stress and whether associations are independent of noise and air pollution. 
Methods: Belgian children aged 6.7-12.2 (N = 172, 50.9% boys) were followed for three years (2012-2015). Information on stress was obtained using standardized behavioral and emotional questionnaires and by a measure of hair cortisol. Residential landscape, including natural, agricultural, industrial, residential areas, and traffic, in a 100-m to 5-km radius around each child's home was characterized. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between psychosocial stress and the residential landscape were studied using linear regression and mixed models, while adjusting for age, sex, and parental socioeconomic status. 
Results: Natural landscapes were positively associated with better emotional status (increased happiness and lower sadness, anxiousness, and total negative emotions, beta = 0.14-0.17, 95% CI = 0.01-0.30). Similarly, we observed an inverse association between residential and traffic density with hyperactivity problems (beta = 0.13-0.18, 95% CI = 0.01-0.34). In longitudinal analyses, industrial area was a predictor of increases in negative emotions, while a natural landscape was for increases in happiness. Only the effect of natural landscape was partly explained by residential noise. 
Conclusion: Residential greenness in proximity to a child's residence might result in a better childhood emotional status, whereas poorer emotional status and behavioral problems (hyperactivity problems) were seen with residential and industrial areas and increased traffic density in proximity to a child's home.}},
  author       = {{van Aart, Carola and Michels, Nathalie and Sioen, Isabelle and De Decker, Annelies and Bijnens, Esmee M and Janssen, Bram G and De Henauw, Stefaan and Nawrot, Tim S}},
  issn         = {{0160-4120}},
  journal      = {{ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL}},
  keywords     = {{Residential landscape,Green space,Psychosocial stress,Children,Adolescents,NEIGHBORHOOD GREEN SPACE,DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS,BEHAVIORAL-PROBLEMS,AIR-POLLUTION,HEALTH,EXPOSURE,PARTICIPATION,COMMUNITIES,DISEASE,OBESITY}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  pages        = {{456--463}},
  title        = {{Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.08.028}},
  volume       = {{120}},
  year         = {{2018}},
}

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