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Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence

(2018) ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL. 120. p.456-463
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Abstract
Background: The effects of residential landscape, i.e., land use and traffic, on psychosocial stress in children are unknown, even though childhood stress might negatively affect normal development. In a longitudinal study, we investigate whether the residential landscape predicts childhood psychosocial stress and whether associations are independent of noise and air pollution. Methods: Belgian children aged 6.7-12.2 (N = 172, 50.9% boys) were followed for three years (2012-2015). Information on stress was obtained using standardized behavioral and emotional questionnaires and by a measure of hair cortisol. Residential landscape, including natural, agricultural, industrial, residential areas, and traffic, in a 100-m to 5-km radius around each child's home was characterized. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between psychosocial stress and the residential landscape were studied using linear regression and mixed models, while adjusting for age, sex, and parental socioeconomic status. Results: Natural landscapes were positively associated with better emotional status (increased happiness and lower sadness, anxiousness, and total negative emotions, beta = 0.14-0.17, 95% CI = 0.01-0.30). Similarly, we observed an inverse association between residential and traffic density with hyperactivity problems (beta = 0.13-0.18, 95% CI = 0.01-0.34). In longitudinal analyses, industrial area was a predictor of increases in negative emotions, while a natural landscape was for increases in happiness. Only the effect of natural landscape was partly explained by residential noise. Conclusion: Residential greenness in proximity to a child's residence might result in a better childhood emotional status, whereas poorer emotional status and behavioral problems (hyperactivity problems) were seen with residential and industrial areas and increased traffic density in proximity to a child's home.
Keywords
Residential landscape, Green space, Psychosocial stress, Children, Adolescents, NEIGHBORHOOD GREEN SPACE, DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS, BEHAVIORAL-PROBLEMS, AIR-POLLUTION, HEALTH, EXPOSURE, PARTICIPATION, COMMUNITIES, DISEASE, OBESITY

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Chicago
van Aart, Carola, Nathalie Michels, Isabelle Sioen, Annelies De Decker, Esmee M Bijnens, Bram G Janssen, Stefaan De Henauw, and Tim S Nawrot. 2018. “Residential Landscape as a Predictor of Psychosocial Stress in the Life Course from Childhood to Adolescence.” Environment International 120: 456–463.
APA
van Aart, C., Michels, N., Sioen, I., De Decker, A., Bijnens, E. M., Janssen, B. G., De Henauw, S., et al. (2018). Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence. ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL, 120, 456–463.
Vancouver
1.
van Aart C, Michels N, Sioen I, De Decker A, Bijnens EM, Janssen BG, et al. Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence. ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL. 2018;120:456–63.
MLA
van Aart, Carola, Nathalie Michels, Isabelle Sioen, et al. “Residential Landscape as a Predictor of Psychosocial Stress in the Life Course from Childhood to Adolescence.” ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL 120 (2018): 456–463. Print.
@article{8571669,
  abstract     = {Background: The effects of residential landscape, i.e., land use and traffic, on psychosocial stress in children are unknown, even though childhood stress might negatively affect normal development. In a longitudinal study, we investigate whether the residential landscape predicts childhood psychosocial stress and whether associations are independent of noise and air pollution. 
Methods: Belgian children aged 6.7-12.2 (N = 172, 50.9\% boys) were followed for three years (2012-2015). Information on stress was obtained using standardized behavioral and emotional questionnaires and by a measure of hair cortisol. Residential landscape, including natural, agricultural, industrial, residential areas, and traffic, in a 100-m to 5-km radius around each child's home was characterized. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between psychosocial stress and the residential landscape were studied using linear regression and mixed models, while adjusting for age, sex, and parental socioeconomic status. 
Results: Natural landscapes were positively associated with better emotional status (increased happiness and lower sadness, anxiousness, and total negative emotions, beta = 0.14-0.17, 95\% CI = 0.01-0.30). Similarly, we observed an inverse association between residential and traffic density with hyperactivity problems (beta = 0.13-0.18, 95\% CI = 0.01-0.34). In longitudinal analyses, industrial area was a predictor of increases in negative emotions, while a natural landscape was for increases in happiness. Only the effect of natural landscape was partly explained by residential noise. 
Conclusion: Residential greenness in proximity to a child's residence might result in a better childhood emotional status, whereas poorer emotional status and behavioral problems (hyperactivity problems) were seen with residential and industrial areas and increased traffic density in proximity to a child's home.},
  author       = {van Aart, Carola and Michels, Nathalie and Sioen, Isabelle and De Decker, Annelies and Bijnens, Esmee M and Janssen, Bram G and De Henauw, Stefaan and Nawrot, Tim S},
  issn         = {0160-4120},
  journal      = {ENVIRONMENT INTERNATIONAL},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {456--463},
  title        = {Residential landscape as a predictor of psychosocial stress in the life course from childhood to adolescence},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.envint.2018.08.028},
  volume       = {120},
  year         = {2018},
}

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