Advanced search
1 file | 709.48 KB

Actinobacteria vs. Fusarium : battle of the toxins

Laura De Mets (UGent) , Kris Audenaert (UGent) and Leen De Gelder (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) is a devastating disease in small-grain cereal, caused by the FHB species complex. Next to yield losses and deteriorated quality, the production of mycotoxins are a serious concern that challenges the global food chain. In a search for alternative methods to control mycotoxins in food and feed, the industry now turns to bacterial inoculants that prevent infection by toxigenic fungi, intervene when crops are being infected or remediate mycotoxin contaminated commodities. Actinobacteria harbour great potential for biocontrol and antifungal activity. In this study, 43 Rhodococcus spp. and 10 Streptomyces spp. were screened for their antifungal activity towards Fusarium graminearum, one of the most important species within the FHB species complex. After a preliminary study using a dual culture plate assay, strains that caused growth inhibition of the fungus were selected for further analysis. Remarkably, three S. rimosus strains caused complete growth inhibition, without any contact front. All three strains also significantly lowered the virulence of the GFP-tagged F. graminearum when applied on detached leaves and inhibited perithecia formation on wheat stubble. The S. rimosus strains were checked for the degradation and detoxification of two Fusarium mycotoxins: zearalenone (ZEN), produced as a defence mechanism, and deoxynivalenol (DON), an important virulence factor in FHB. All three strains showed 100% degradation and detoxification of ZEN. Results for DON degradation are currenlty being investigated. Degradation of these mycotoxins can not only give information regarding (one of multiple) biocontrol mechanisms, but also render the strains dual mode-of-action agents.

Downloads

  • Poster biocontrole.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 709.48 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
De Mets, Laura, Kris Audenaert, and Leen De Gelder. 2018. “Actinobacteria Vs. Fusarium : Battle of the Toxins.” In Microbial Ecology, 17th International Symposium, Abstracts.
APA
De Mets, L., Audenaert, K., & De Gelder, L. (2018). Actinobacteria vs. Fusarium : battle of the toxins. Microbial Ecology, 17th International symposium, Abstracts. Presented at the 17th International symposium on Microbial Ecology (ISME-17).
Vancouver
1.
De Mets L, Audenaert K, De Gelder L. Actinobacteria vs. Fusarium : battle of the toxins. Microbial Ecology, 17th International symposium, Abstracts. 2018.
MLA
De Mets, Laura, Kris Audenaert, and Leen De Gelder. “Actinobacteria Vs. Fusarium : Battle of the Toxins.” Microbial Ecology, 17th International Symposium, Abstracts. 2018. Print.
@inproceedings{8571606,
  abstract     = {Fusarium Head Blight (FHB) is a devastating disease in small-grain cereal, caused by the FHB species complex. Next to yield losses and deteriorated quality, the production of mycotoxins are a serious concern that challenges the global food chain. In a search for alternative methods to control mycotoxins in food and feed, the industry now turns to bacterial inoculants that prevent infection by toxigenic fungi, intervene when crops are being infected or remediate mycotoxin contaminated commodities. 
Actinobacteria harbour great potential for biocontrol and antifungal activity. In this study, 43 Rhodococcus spp. and 10 Streptomyces spp. were screened for their antifungal activity towards Fusarium graminearum, one of the most important species within the FHB species complex. After a preliminary study using a dual culture plate assay, strains that caused growth inhibition of the fungus were selected for further analysis. Remarkably, three S. rimosus strains caused complete growth inhibition, without any contact front. All three strains also significantly lowered the virulence of the GFP-tagged F. graminearum when applied on detached leaves and inhibited perithecia formation on wheat stubble.
The S. rimosus strains were checked for the degradation and detoxification of two Fusarium mycotoxins: zearalenone (ZEN), produced as a defence mechanism, and deoxynivalenol (DON), an important virulence factor in FHB. All three strains showed 100\% degradation and detoxification of ZEN. Results for DON degradation are currenlty being investigated. Degradation of these mycotoxins can not only give information regarding (one of multiple) biocontrol mechanisms, but also render the strains dual mode-of-action agents.},
  author       = {De Mets, Laura and Audenaert, Kris and De Gelder, Leen},
  booktitle    = {Microbial Ecology, 17th International symposium, Abstracts},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Leipzig, Germany},
  title        = {Actinobacteria vs. Fusarium : battle of the toxins},
  year         = {2018},
}