Advanced search
1 file | 255.53 KB

Cardiovascular disease after transplantation : an emerging role of the immune system

(2018) TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL. 31(7). p.689-699
Author
Organization
Abstract
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) after transplantation remains a major concern. Little is known about what drives the increased cardiovascular risk in transplant recipients apart from traditional risk factors. The immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension, atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease in the general population. Recently, inhibition of interleukin 1 - by canakinumab versus placebo decreased the incidence of cardiovascular events. Emerging evidence points to a role of adaptive cellular immunity in the development of CVD. Especially, expansion of pro-inflammatory and antiapoptotic cytotoxic CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells is closely associated with incident CVD in various study populations including transplant recipients. The association of cytomegalovirus exposure with increased cardiovascular mortality might be explained by its capacity to upregulate these cytotoxic cells. Also, humoral immunity seems to be relevant for cardiovascular outcome in transplant recipients. Panel-reactive antibodies at baseline and donor-specific antibodies are independently associated with poor cardiovascular outcome after kidney transplantation. Cardiovascular effects of immunosuppressive drugs and statins do not only imply indirect positive or negative effects on traditional cardiovascular risk factors but also intrinsic immunological effects. How immunosuppressive drugs modify atherosclerosis largely remains elusive.
Keywords
CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT VASCULOPATHY, REGULATORY T-CELLS, BRONCHIOLITIS, OBLITERANS SYNDROME, CORONARY-ARTERY-DISEASE, HUMAN-LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN, NON-HLA ANTIBODIES, KIDNEY-TRANSPLANTATION, LUNG TRANSPLANTATION, HEART-TRANSPLANT, LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION, atherosclerosis, cardiovascular, immunosuppressive, mortality, transplantation, Treg

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 255.53 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Van Laecke, Steven, Thomas Malfait, Eva Schepers, and Wim Van Biesen. 2018. “Cardiovascular Disease After Transplantation : an Emerging Role of the Immune System.” Transplant International 31 (7): 689–699.
APA
Van Laecke, S., Malfait, T., Schepers, E., & Van Biesen, W. (2018). Cardiovascular disease after transplantation : an emerging role of the immune system. TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL, 31(7), 689–699.
Vancouver
1.
Van Laecke S, Malfait T, Schepers E, Van Biesen W. Cardiovascular disease after transplantation : an emerging role of the immune system. TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL. 2018;31(7):689–99.
MLA
Van Laecke, Steven et al. “Cardiovascular Disease After Transplantation : an Emerging Role of the Immune System.” TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL 31.7 (2018): 689–699. Print.
@article{8569306,
  abstract     = {Cardiovascular disease (CVD) after transplantation remains a major concern. Little is known about what drives the increased cardiovascular risk in transplant recipients apart from traditional risk factors. The immune system is involved in the pathogenesis of hypertension, atherosclerosis, and coronary artery disease in the general population. Recently, inhibition of interleukin 1 - by canakinumab versus placebo decreased the incidence of cardiovascular events. Emerging evidence points to a role of adaptive cellular immunity in the development of CVD. Especially, expansion of pro-inflammatory and antiapoptotic cytotoxic CD4(+)CD28(null) T cells is closely associated with incident CVD in various study populations including transplant recipients. The association of cytomegalovirus exposure with increased cardiovascular mortality might be explained by its capacity to upregulate these cytotoxic cells. Also, humoral immunity seems to be relevant for cardiovascular outcome in transplant recipients. Panel-reactive antibodies at baseline and donor-specific antibodies are independently associated with poor cardiovascular outcome after kidney transplantation. Cardiovascular effects of immunosuppressive drugs and statins do not only imply indirect positive or negative effects on traditional cardiovascular risk factors but also intrinsic immunological effects. How immunosuppressive drugs modify atherosclerosis largely remains elusive.},
  author       = {Van Laecke, Steven and Malfait, Thomas and Schepers, Eva and Van Biesen, Wim},
  issn         = {0934-0874},
  journal      = {TRANSPLANT INTERNATIONAL},
  keywords     = {CARDIAC ALLOGRAFT VASCULOPATHY,REGULATORY T-CELLS,BRONCHIOLITIS,OBLITERANS SYNDROME,CORONARY-ARTERY-DISEASE,HUMAN-LEUKOCYTE ANTIGEN,NON-HLA ANTIBODIES,KIDNEY-TRANSPLANTATION,LUNG TRANSPLANTATION,HEART-TRANSPLANT,LIVER-TRANSPLANTATION,atherosclerosis,cardiovascular,immunosuppressive,mortality,transplantation,Treg},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {7},
  pages        = {689--699},
  title        = {Cardiovascular disease after transplantation : an emerging role of the immune system},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/tri.13160},
  volume       = {31},
  year         = {2018},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: