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One MRI-compatible tDCS session attenuates ventromedial cortical perfusion when exposed to verbal criticism : the role of perceived criticism

(2018) HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING. 39(11). p.4462-4470
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The integrative neuroscience of behavioral control (Neuroscience)
Abstract
Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a potential treatment strategy for mood and anxiety disorders, but how this application may influence emotional processes, and whether this is related to individual characteristics, is not well understood. It has been proposed that perceived criticism (PC) may represent a vulnerability factor for the development of such mental illnesses. To decipher whether neural mechanisms of action of tDCS potentially differ depending on PC status (low vs. high), we evaluated mood and brain perfusion before and after applying MRI-compatible tDCS, and after participants were exposed to verbal criticism in the scanner. Experimental design 30 healthy nondepressed females were included in a sham-controlled crossover MRI-compatible tDCS study. Brain perfusion was measured by means of arterial spin labeling (ASL) before and after tDCS applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and after hearing criticism. Before the experiment, all participants provided a rating of PC in their closest environment. Principal observations at the behavioral level, criticism made participants angrier. This was unrelated to the active or sham stimulation. After being criticized, females scoring high on PC had significantly decreased brain perfusion in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC) and medioprefrontal cortex (mPFC), after active tDCS but not sham. The decrease in pgACC/mPFC perfusion points to a significant impact of tDCS in brain areas related to stress responses and self-referential processes, especially in females scoring high on PC, which has been shown to be related to vulnerability for mood and anxiety disorders.
Keywords
Arterial spin labeling, Medial prefrontal cortex, Perceived criticism, Transcranial direct current stimulation, DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION, DORSOLATERAL PREFRONTAL CORTEX, ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE, BRAIN-STIMULATION, MAJOR DEPRESSION, NEURAL RESPONSES, WORKING-MEMORY, HEALTHY, STATE

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Baeken, Chris, Josefien Dedoncker, Jonathan Remue, Guo-Rong Wu, Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt, Sara De Witte, Tasha Poppa, Jill M Hooley, and Rudi De Raedt. 2018. “One MRI-compatible tDCS Session Attenuates Ventromedial Cortical Perfusion When Exposed to Verbal Criticism : the Role of Perceived Criticism.” Human Brain Mapping 39 (11): 4462–4470.
APA
Baeken, C., Dedoncker, J., Remue, J., Wu, G.-R., Vanderhasselt, M.-A., De Witte, S., Poppa, T., et al. (2018). One MRI-compatible tDCS session attenuates ventromedial cortical perfusion when exposed to verbal criticism : the role of perceived criticism. HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING, 39(11), 4462–4470.
Vancouver
1.
Baeken C, Dedoncker J, Remue J, Wu G-R, Vanderhasselt M-A, De Witte S, et al. One MRI-compatible tDCS session attenuates ventromedial cortical perfusion when exposed to verbal criticism : the role of perceived criticism. HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING. 2018;39(11):4462–70.
MLA
Baeken, Chris, Josefien Dedoncker, Jonathan Remue, et al. “One MRI-compatible tDCS Session Attenuates Ventromedial Cortical Perfusion When Exposed to Verbal Criticism : the Role of Perceived Criticism.” HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING 39.11 (2018): 4462–4470. Print.
@article{8569118,
  abstract     = {Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a potential treatment strategy for mood and anxiety disorders, but how this application may influence emotional processes, and whether this is related to individual characteristics, is not well understood. It has been proposed that perceived criticism (PC) may represent a vulnerability factor for the development of such mental illnesses. To decipher whether neural mechanisms of action of tDCS potentially differ depending on PC status (low vs. high), we evaluated mood and brain perfusion before and after applying MRI-compatible tDCS, and after participants were exposed to verbal criticism in the scanner. Experimental design 30 healthy nondepressed females were included in a sham-controlled crossover MRI-compatible tDCS study. Brain perfusion was measured by means of arterial spin labeling (ASL) before and after tDCS applied to the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and after hearing criticism. Before the experiment, all participants provided a rating of PC in their closest environment. Principal observations at the behavioral level, criticism made participants angrier. This was unrelated to the active or sham stimulation. After being criticized, females scoring high on PC had significantly decreased brain perfusion in the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pgACC) and medioprefrontal cortex (mPFC), after active tDCS but not sham. The decrease in pgACC/mPFC perfusion points to a significant impact of tDCS in brain areas related to stress responses and self-referential processes, especially in females scoring high on PC, which has been shown to be related to vulnerability for mood and anxiety disorders.},
  author       = {Baeken, Chris and Dedoncker, Josefien and Remue, Jonathan and Wu, Guo-Rong and Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne and De Witte, Sara and Poppa, Tasha and Hooley, Jill M and De Raedt, Rudi},
  issn         = {1065-9471},
  journal      = {HUMAN BRAIN MAPPING},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {11},
  pages        = {4462--4470},
  title        = {One MRI-compatible tDCS session attenuates ventromedial cortical perfusion when exposed to verbal criticism : the role of perceived criticism},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/hbm.24285},
  volume       = {39},
  year         = {2018},
}

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