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Vitiligo: een update

A Lommerts, Nanja van Geel UGent, Reinhart Speeckaert, W Van der Veen, C Vrijman, I Nieuwenboer-Krobotova, D Njoo, A Wolkenstorfer and M Bekkenk (2016) Nederlands Tijdschrift Dermatologie en Venereologie. 26(3). p.149-154
abstract
Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting skin disorders with a prevalence of 0.5-1% of the world’s population. The quality of life is often impaired in vitiligo patients and psychological problems remain mostly unnoticed. Two main features are important for the diagnosis and treatment of vitiligo; (i) distribution and (ii) extent of the depigmentation. Vitiligo can be divided in two subtypes: (a) non-segmental vitiligo and (b) segmental vitiligo. Non-segmental vitiligo is most probably caused by an auto-immune response and the cause of segmental vitiligo remains unclarified. The prevalence of autoimmune thyroid disease in non-segmental vitiligo patients is high and thus clinicians should be aware of the signs of thyroid disease in vitiligo patients. Screening for thyroid disease can be considered in high risk vitiligo patients, such as: (i) children, (ii) women > 35 years, (iii) patients with a positive family history of vitiligo and/or thyroid disease, and (iv) patients with extensive vitiligo. In children screening for thyroid disease is especially important considerin the negative effects of thyroid disease on the growth, development and educational performance. Non-surgical treatments that are available for vitiligo are: local treatment with corticosteroids and/ or topical immunemodulators (TIMs) which can be combined with narrowband UVB treatment in severe vitiligo. Surgical treatment can be performed in stable disease, most preferably in segmental vitiligo. For the choice of treatment it is important to differentiate between nonsegmental and segmental vitiligo.
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author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
journal title
Nederlands Tijdschrift Dermatologie en Venereologie
volume
26
issue
3
pages
5 pages
language
Dutch
UGent publication?
yes
classification
U
copyright statement
I don't know the status of the copyright for this publication
id
8568965
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8568965
date created
2018-07-10 14:47:35
date last changed
2018-07-10 14:47:35
@article{8568965,
  abstract     = {Vitiligo is the most common depigmenting skin disorders
with a prevalence of 0.5-1\% of the world{\textquoteright}s population.
The quality of life is often impaired in vitiligo
patients and psychological problems remain mostly
unnoticed. Two main features are important for the
diagnosis and treatment of vitiligo; (i) distribution and
(ii) extent of the depigmentation. Vitiligo can be divided
in two subtypes: (a) non-segmental vitiligo and (b) segmental
vitiligo. Non-segmental vitiligo is most probably
caused by an auto-immune response and the cause of
segmental vitiligo remains unclarified. The prevalence
of autoimmune thyroid disease in non-segmental vitiligo
patients is high and thus clinicians should be aware of
the signs of thyroid disease in vitiligo patients. Screening
for thyroid disease can be considered in high risk vitiligo
patients, such as: (i) children, (ii) women {\textrangle} 35 years, (iii)
patients with a positive family history of vitiligo and/or
thyroid disease, and (iv) patients with extensive vitiligo.
In children screening for thyroid disease is especially
important considerin the negative effects of thyroid
disease on the growth, development and educational
performance. Non-surgical treatments that are available
for vitiligo are: local treatment with corticosteroids and/
or topical immunemodulators (TIMs) which can be combined
with narrowband UVB treatment in severe vitiligo.
Surgical treatment can be performed in stable disease,
most preferably in segmental vitiligo. For the choice of
treatment it is important to differentiate between nonsegmental
and segmental vitiligo.},
  author       = {Lommerts, A and van Geel, Nanja and Speeckaert, Reinhart and Van der Veen, W and Vrijman, C and Nieuwenboer-Krobotova, I and Njoo, D and Wolkenstorfer, A and Bekkenk, M},
  journal      = {Nederlands Tijdschrift Dermatologie en Venereologie},
  language     = {dut},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {149--154},
  title        = {Vitiligo: een update},
  volume       = {26},
  year         = {2016},
}

Chicago
Lommerts, A, Nanja van Geel, Reinhart Speeckaert, W Van der Veen, C Vrijman, I Nieuwenboer-Krobotova, D Njoo, A Wolkenstorfer, and M Bekkenk. 2016. “Vitiligo: Een Update.” Nederlands Tijdschrift Dermatologie En Venereologie 26 (3): 149–154.
APA
Lommerts, A., van Geel, N., Speeckaert, R., Van der Veen, W., Vrijman, C., Nieuwenboer-Krobotova, I., Njoo, D., et al. (2016). Vitiligo: een update. Nederlands Tijdschrift Dermatologie en Venereologie, 26(3), 149–154.
Vancouver
1.
Lommerts A, van Geel N, Speeckaert R, Van der Veen W, Vrijman C, Nieuwenboer-Krobotova I, et al. Vitiligo: een update. Nederlands Tijdschrift Dermatologie en Venereologie. 2016;26(3):149–54.
MLA
Lommerts, A, Nanja van Geel, Reinhart Speeckaert, et al. “Vitiligo: Een Update.” Nederlands Tijdschrift Dermatologie en Venereologie 26.3 (2016): 149–154. Print.