Advanced search
1 file | 631.73 KB Add to list

Measuring disability : a systematic review of the validity and reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI)

Author
Organization
Abstract
Background: GALI or Global Activity Limitation Indicator is a global survey instrument measuring participation restriction. GALI is the measure underlying the European indicator Healthy Life Years (HLY). Gali has a substantial policy use within the EU and its Member States. The objective of current paper is to bring together what is known from published manuscripts on the validity and the reliability of GALI. Methods: Following the PRISMA guidelines, two search strategies (PUBMED, Google Scholar) were combined to identify manuscripts published in English with publication date 2000 or beyond. Articles were classified as reliability studies, concurrent or predictive validity studies, in national or international populations. Results: Four cross-sectional studies (of which 2 international) studied how GALI relates to other health measures (concurrent validity). A dose-response effect by GALI severity level on the association with the other health status measures was observed in the national studies. The 2 international studies (SHARE, EHIS) concluded that the odds of reporting participation restriction was higher in subjects with self-reported or observed functional limitations. In SHARE, the size of the Odds Ratio's (ORs) in the different countries was homogeneous, while in EHIS the size of the ORs varied more strongly. For the predictive validity, subjects were followed over time (4 studies of which one international). GALI proved, both in national and international data, to be a consistent predictor of future health outcomes both in terms of mortality and health care expenditure. As predictors of mortality, the two distinct health concepts, self-rated health and GALI, acted independently and complementary of each other. The one reliability study identified reported a sufficient reliability of GALI. Conclusion: GALI as inclusive one question instrument fits all conceptual characteristics specified for a global measure on participation restriction. In none of the studies, included in the review, there was evidence of a failing validity. The review shows that GALI has a good and sufficient concurrent and predictive validity, and reliability.
Keywords
Disability, Participation restriction, Healthy life years, Validity, Reliability, Summary measure of population health, GALI, SELF-RATED HEALTH, POPULATION HEALTH, OLDER-ADULTS, MORTALITY, PARTICIPATION, PREDICTORS, MORBIDITY, QUESTION, PROJECT, EUROPE

Downloads

  • s13690-018-0270-8.pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • open access
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 631.73 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Van Oyen, Herman, et al. “Measuring Disability : A Systematic Review of the Validity and Reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI).” ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH, vol. 76, 2018, doi:10.1186/s13690-018-0270-8.
APA
Van Oyen, H., Bogaert, P., Yokota, R. T., & Berger, N. (2018). Measuring disability : a systematic review of the validity and reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI). ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH, 76. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13690-018-0270-8
Chicago author-date
Van Oyen, Herman, Petronille Bogaert, Renata TC Yokota, and Nicolas Berger. 2018. “Measuring Disability : A Systematic Review of the Validity and Reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI).” ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH 76. https://doi.org/10.1186/s13690-018-0270-8.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Van Oyen, Herman, Petronille Bogaert, Renata TC Yokota, and Nicolas Berger. 2018. “Measuring Disability : A Systematic Review of the Validity and Reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI).” ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH 76. doi:10.1186/s13690-018-0270-8.
Vancouver
1.
Van Oyen H, Bogaert P, Yokota RT, Berger N. Measuring disability : a systematic review of the validity and reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI). ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH. 2018;76.
IEEE
[1]
H. Van Oyen, P. Bogaert, R. T. Yokota, and N. Berger, “Measuring disability : a systematic review of the validity and reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI),” ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH, vol. 76, 2018.
@article{8567907,
  abstract     = {Background: GALI or Global Activity Limitation Indicator is a global survey instrument measuring participation restriction. GALI is the measure underlying the European indicator Healthy Life Years (HLY). Gali has a substantial policy use within the EU and its Member States. The objective of current paper is to bring together what is known from published manuscripts on the validity and the reliability of GALI. 
Methods: Following the PRISMA guidelines, two search strategies (PUBMED, Google Scholar) were combined to identify manuscripts published in English with publication date 2000 or beyond. Articles were classified as reliability studies, concurrent or predictive validity studies, in national or international populations. 
Results: Four cross-sectional studies (of which 2 international) studied how GALI relates to other health measures (concurrent validity). A dose-response effect by GALI severity level on the association with the other health status measures was observed in the national studies. The 2 international studies (SHARE, EHIS) concluded that the odds of reporting participation restriction was higher in subjects with self-reported or observed functional limitations. In SHARE, the size of the Odds Ratio's (ORs) in the different countries was homogeneous, while in EHIS the size of the ORs varied more strongly. For the predictive validity, subjects were followed over time (4 studies of which one international). GALI proved, both in national and international data, to be a consistent predictor of future health outcomes both in terms of mortality and health care expenditure. As predictors of mortality, the two distinct health concepts, self-rated health and GALI, acted independently and complementary of each other. The one reliability study identified reported a sufficient reliability of GALI. 
Conclusion: GALI as inclusive one question instrument fits all conceptual characteristics specified for a global measure on participation restriction. In none of the studies, included in the review, there was evidence of a failing validity. The review shows that GALI has a good and sufficient concurrent and predictive validity, and reliability.},
  articleno    = {25},
  author       = {Van Oyen, Herman and Bogaert, Petronille and Yokota, Renata TC and Berger, Nicolas},
  issn         = {0778-7367},
  journal      = {ARCHIVES OF PUBLIC HEALTH},
  keywords     = {Disability,Participation restriction,Healthy life years,Validity,Reliability,Summary measure of population health,GALI,SELF-RATED HEALTH,POPULATION HEALTH,OLDER-ADULTS,MORTALITY,PARTICIPATION,PREDICTORS,MORBIDITY,QUESTION,PROJECT,EUROPE},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {11},
  title        = {Measuring disability : a systematic review of the validity and reliability of the Global Activity Limitations Indicator (GALI)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/s13690-018-0270-8},
  volume       = {76},
  year         = {2018},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: