Advanced search
1 file | 1.79 MB

Life from the ashes : survival of dry bacterial spores after very high temperature exposure

(2018) EXTREMOPHILES. 22(5). p.751-759
Author
Organization
Abstract
We found that spores of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens rank amongst the most resistant to high temperatures with a maximum dry heat tolerance determined at 420 °C. We found that this extreme heat resistance was also maintained after several generations suggesting that the DNA was able to replicate after exposure to these temperatures. Nonetheless, amplifying the bacterial DNA using BOXA1R and (GTG)5 primers was unsuccessful immediately after extreme heating, but was successful after incubation of the heated then cooled spores. Moreover, enzymes such as amylases and proteases were active directly after heating and spore regeneration, indicating that DNA coding for these enzymes were not degraded at these temperatures. Our results suggest that extensive DNA damage may occur in spores of B. amyloliquefaciens directly after an extreme heat shock. However, the successful germination of spores after inoculation and incubation indicates that these spores could have a very efective DNA repair mechanism, most likely protein-based, able to function after exposure to temperatures up to 420 °C. Therefore, we propose that B. amyloliquefaciens is one of the most heat resistant life forms known to science and can be used as a model organism for studying heat resistance and DNA repair. Furthermore, the extremely high temperature resistivity of these spores has exceptional consequences for general methodology, such as the use of dry heat sterilization and, therefore, virtually all studies in the broad area of high temperature biology.
Keywords
Heat resistance, Bacillus spores, Extremophiles, DNA damage-repair, BACILLUS-SUBTILIS SPORES, DNA-REPAIR, EXTREMELY RESISTANT, SP-NOV, HEAT, IDENTIFICATION, ENDOSPORES, EXTRACTION, PROTEINS, DAMAGE

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 1.79 MB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Beladjal, Lynda, Tom Gheysens, James S Clegg, Mohamed Amar, and Johan Mertens. 2018. “Life from the Ashes : Survival of Dry Bacterial Spores After Very High Temperature Exposure.” Extremophiles 22 (5): 751–759.
APA
Beladjal, L., Gheysens, T., Clegg, J. S., Amar, M., & Mertens, J. (2018). Life from the ashes : survival of dry bacterial spores after very high temperature exposure. EXTREMOPHILES, 22(5), 751–759.
Vancouver
1.
Beladjal L, Gheysens T, Clegg JS, Amar M, Mertens J. Life from the ashes : survival of dry bacterial spores after very high temperature exposure. EXTREMOPHILES. 2018;22(5):751–9.
MLA
Beladjal, Lynda et al. “Life from the Ashes : Survival of Dry Bacterial Spores After Very High Temperature Exposure.” EXTREMOPHILES 22.5 (2018): 751–759. Print.
@article{8567606,
  abstract     = {We found that spores of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens rank amongst the most resistant to high temperatures with a maximum dry heat tolerance determined at 420 {\textdegree}C. We found that this extreme heat resistance was also maintained after several generations suggesting that the DNA was able to replicate after exposure to these temperatures. Nonetheless, amplifying the bacterial DNA using BOXA1R and (GTG)5 primers was unsuccessful immediately after extreme heating, but was successful after incubation of the heated then cooled spores. Moreover, enzymes such as amylases and proteases were active directly after heating and spore regeneration, indicating that DNA coding for these enzymes were not degraded at these temperatures.
Our results suggest that extensive DNA damage may occur in spores of B. amyloliquefaciens directly after an extreme heat shock. However, the successful germination of spores after inoculation and incubation indicates that these spores could have a very efective DNA repair mechanism, most likely protein-based, able to function after exposure to temperatures up to 420 {\textdegree}C. Therefore, we propose that B. amyloliquefaciens is one of the most heat resistant life forms known to science and can be used as a model organism for studying heat resistance and DNA repair. Furthermore, the extremely high temperature resistivity of these spores has exceptional consequences for general methodology, such as the use of dry heat sterilization and, therefore, virtually all studies in the broad area of high temperature biology.},
  author       = {Beladjal, Lynda and Gheysens, Tom and Clegg, James S and Amar, Mohamed and Mertens, Johan},
  issn         = {1431-0651},
  journal      = {EXTREMOPHILES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {751--759},
  title        = {Life from the ashes : survival of dry bacterial spores after very high temperature exposure},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00792-018-1035-6},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2018},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: