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Contextual factors influence work outcomes in employed patients with ankylosing spondylitis starting etanercept : 2-year results from AS@Work

(2018) RHEUMATOLOGY. 57(5). p.791-797
Author
Organization
Abstract
Objectives. The aim was to determine changes over time in work outcomes and investigate the predictive value of baseline personal and work-related factors on the evolution of work outcomes among employed patients with AS initiating etanercept. Methods. Employment status, absenteeism and presenteeism were assessed using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment for AS questionnaire in a 24-month open-label, observational study (NCT01421303). The potential effect of baseline factors on work outcomes was analysed using predictive modelling (Cox regression and linear mixed models). Results. After 24 months, 11/75 (14.7%) patients had permanently withdrawn from employment (seven because of AS). Absenteeism and presenteeism decreased significantly within 6 months of etanercept treatment and remained stable thereafter. Predictive modelling indicated that male sex (hazard ratio = 0.18; 95% CI: 0.04, 0.85), (log) number of working hours per week (hazard ratio = 0.13; 95% CI: 0.03, 0.51) and the possibility of developing skills (hazard ratio = 0.42; 95% CI: 0.19, 0.91) positively influenced time in employment. Over time, lower absenteeism was significantly associated with the quality of contact with colleagues [coefficient (S.E.): -0.35 (0.10)] and importance of the job for quality of life [-0.49 (0.17)], and higher absenteeism with current smoking [1.66 (0.44)] and change in job because of illness [1.51 (0.66)]. Over time, lower presenteeism was associated with male sex [-14.5 (2.64)], the possibility of postponing work [-6.60 (2.73)], quality of contact with colleagues [-2.04 (0.96)] and >50 workers in the company [-7.65 (2.76)], and higher presenteeism with manual profession [8.41 (2.72)]. Conclusion. Contextual factors influence work outcomes over time and should not be ignored when aiming to improve work outcomes in patients with AS.
Keywords
absenteeism, ankylosing spondylitis, contextual factors, etanercept, presenteeism, unemployment, work outcomes, SICK LEAVE, EUROPEAN COUNTRIES, PRODUCTIVITY, PRESENTEEISM, DISABILITY, THERAPY, INDEX, BATH, POPULATION, IMPACT

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Chicago
Boonen, Annelies, Caroline Boone, Adelin Albert, and Herman Mielants. 2018. “Contextual Factors Influence Work Outcomes in Employed Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis Starting Etanercept : 2-year Results from AS@Work.” Rheumatology 57 (5): 791–797.
APA
Boonen, Annelies, Boone, C., Albert, A., & Mielants, H. (2018). Contextual factors influence work outcomes in employed patients with ankylosing spondylitis starting etanercept : 2-year results from AS@Work. RHEUMATOLOGY, 57(5), 791–797.
Vancouver
1.
Boonen A, Boone C, Albert A, Mielants H. Contextual factors influence work outcomes in employed patients with ankylosing spondylitis starting etanercept : 2-year results from AS@Work. RHEUMATOLOGY. 2018;57(5):791–7.
MLA
Boonen, Annelies, Caroline Boone, Adelin Albert, et al. “Contextual Factors Influence Work Outcomes in Employed Patients with Ankylosing Spondylitis Starting Etanercept : 2-year Results from AS@Work.” RHEUMATOLOGY 57.5 (2018): 791–797. Print.
@article{8567089,
  abstract     = {Objectives. The aim was to determine changes over time in work outcomes and investigate the predictive value of baseline personal and work-related factors on the evolution of work outcomes among employed patients with AS initiating etanercept. 
Methods. Employment status, absenteeism and presenteeism were assessed using the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment for AS questionnaire in a 24-month open-label, observational study (NCT01421303). The potential effect of baseline factors on work outcomes was analysed using predictive modelling (Cox regression and linear mixed models). 
Results. After 24 months, 11/75 (14.7\%) patients had permanently withdrawn from employment (seven because of AS). Absenteeism and presenteeism decreased significantly within 6 months of etanercept treatment and remained stable thereafter. Predictive modelling indicated that male sex (hazard ratio = 0.18; 95\% CI: 0.04, 0.85), (log) number of working hours per week (hazard ratio = 0.13; 95\% CI: 0.03, 0.51) and the possibility of developing skills (hazard ratio = 0.42; 95\% CI: 0.19, 0.91) positively influenced time in employment. Over time, lower absenteeism was significantly associated with the quality of contact with colleagues [coefficient (S.E.): -0.35 (0.10)] and importance of the job for quality of life [-0.49 (0.17)], and higher absenteeism with current smoking [1.66 (0.44)] and change in job because of illness [1.51 (0.66)]. Over time, lower presenteeism was associated with male sex [-14.5 (2.64)], the possibility of postponing work [-6.60 (2.73)], quality of contact with colleagues [-2.04 (0.96)] and {\textrangle}50 workers in the company [-7.65 (2.76)], and higher presenteeism with manual profession [8.41 (2.72)]. 
Conclusion. Contextual factors influence work outcomes over time and should not be ignored when aiming to improve work outcomes in patients with AS.},
  author       = {Boonen, Annelies and Boone, Caroline and Albert, Adelin and Mielants, Herman},
  issn         = {1462-0324},
  journal      = {RHEUMATOLOGY},
  keyword      = {absenteeism,ankylosing spondylitis,contextual factors,etanercept,presenteeism,unemployment,work outcomes,SICK LEAVE,EUROPEAN COUNTRIES,PRODUCTIVITY,PRESENTEEISM,DISABILITY,THERAPY,INDEX,BATH,POPULATION,IMPACT},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {791--797},
  title        = {Contextual factors influence work outcomes in employed patients with ankylosing spondylitis starting etanercept : 2-year results from AS@Work},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kex476},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2018},
}

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