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Constitutive relevance in cognitive science : the case of eye movements and cognitive mechanisms

Dingmar van Eck (UGent)
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Abstract
In this paper I assess whether the recently proposed "No De-Coupling" (NDC) theory of constitutive relevance in mechanisms is a useful tool to reconstruct constitutive relevance investigations in scientific practice. The NDC theory has been advanced as a framework theoretically superior to the mutual manipulability (MM) account of constitutive relevance in mechanisms but, in contrast to the MM account, has not yet been applied to detailed case studies. I argue that the NDC account is also applicable to empirical practice and that it fares better than the MM account on both theoretical and empirical grounds. I elaborate these claims in terms of applications of the NDC theory to two case studies of cognitive science research on the role of eye movements in mechanisms for cognitive capacities. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Keywords
Constitutive relevance, Mechanism, Mechanistic explanation, Cognitive science, MEMORY, CAUSATION, PLAY

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
van Eck, Dingmar. 2019. “Constitutive Relevance in Cognitive Science : the Case of Eye Movements and Cognitive Mechanisms.” Studies in History and Philosophy of Science 73: 44–53.
APA
van Eck, D. (2019). Constitutive relevance in cognitive science : the case of eye movements and cognitive mechanisms. STUDIES IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE, 73, 44–53.
Vancouver
1.
van Eck D. Constitutive relevance in cognitive science : the case of eye movements and cognitive mechanisms. STUDIES IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE. 2019;73:44–53.
MLA
van Eck, Dingmar. “Constitutive Relevance in Cognitive Science : the Case of Eye Movements and Cognitive Mechanisms.” STUDIES IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE 73 (2019): 44–53. Print.
@article{8566642,
  abstract     = {In this paper I assess whether the recently proposed "No De-Coupling" (NDC) theory of constitutive relevance in mechanisms is a useful tool to reconstruct constitutive relevance investigations in scientific practice. The NDC theory has been advanced as a framework theoretically superior to the mutual manipulability (MM) account of constitutive relevance in mechanisms but, in contrast to the MM account, has not yet been applied to detailed case studies. I argue that the NDC account is also applicable to empirical practice and that it fares better than the MM account on both theoretical and empirical grounds. I elaborate these claims in terms of applications of the NDC theory to two case studies of cognitive science research on the role of eye movements in mechanisms for cognitive capacities. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.},
  author       = {van Eck, Dingmar},
  issn         = {0039-3681 },
  journal      = {STUDIES IN HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE},
  keywords     = {Constitutive relevance,Mechanism,Mechanistic explanation,Cognitive science,MEMORY,CAUSATION,PLAY},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {44--53},
  title        = {Constitutive relevance in cognitive science : the case of eye movements and cognitive mechanisms},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.shpsa.2018.05.013},
  volume       = {73},
  year         = {2019},
}

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