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Central pain modulation in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders

Author
Organization
Abstract
Based upon previous evidence for the presence of secondary hyperalgesia and altered cortical nociceptive processing, central sensitization (CS) might be present in children with pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Still, indices of CS should be further investigated in order to provide firm evidence regarding its contribution in children with AP-FGIDs. Aims: To compare indices of CS in children with AP-FGIDs versus healthy controls. Methods: In this case-control study a total sample size of 66 children; 33 patients with AP-FGIDs and 33 healthy controls (6 - 12 years) will be studied. Patients will be recruited during medical examination by a pediatric specialist of the University Hospital of Antwerp. Healthy controls will be selected and matched with the patient group according to age, sex and socio-economic status. All participants will undergo experimental pain assessments to measure primary and secondary hyperalgesia (pressure pain thresholds at local and remote sites) and efficacy of endogenous pain inhibition (conditioned pain modulation). Furthermore, children’s self-reports of pain intensity and fear of pain, as well as parental reports of their child’s functional disabilities, parental catastrophic thinking, fear and avoidance behavior associated to their child’s pain will be measured. Expected hypothesis: Children with AP-FGID’s are expected to show less efficient central pain modulation compared to healthy children. Preliminary results will be available and discussed during the congress. Implications: Findings will have implications for a better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to AP-FGID’s and may thus be helpful in the development of pain mechanism-based treatment strategies.
Keywords
Pediatric pain, brain/central nervous system, pain assessment

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Pas, Roselien, Kelly Ickmans, Sophie Van Oosterwijck, et al. “Central Pain Modulation in Children with Abdominal Pain-related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.” PAIN Research Meeting, Abstracts. 2017. 30–30. Print.
APA
Pas, Roselien, Ickmans, K., Van Oosterwijck, S., Van der Cruyssen, K., Foubert, A., Leysen, L., Nijs, J., et al. (2017). Central pain modulation in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders. PAIN Research Meeting, Abstracts (pp. 30–30). Presented at the 16th PAIN Research Meeting (PRM) 2017.
Chicago author-date
Pas, Roselien, Kelly Ickmans, Sophie Van Oosterwijck, Kelly Van der Cruyssen, Anthe Foubert, Laurence Leysen, Jo Nijs, and Mira Meeus. 2017. “Central Pain Modulation in Children with Abdominal Pain-related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.” In PAIN Research Meeting, Abstracts, 30–30.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Pas, Roselien, Kelly Ickmans, Sophie Van Oosterwijck, Kelly Van der Cruyssen, Anthe Foubert, Laurence Leysen, Jo Nijs, and Mira Meeus. 2017. “Central Pain Modulation in Children with Abdominal Pain-related Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders.” In PAIN Research Meeting, Abstracts, 30–30.
Vancouver
1.
Pas R, Ickmans K, Van Oosterwijck S, Van der Cruyssen K, Foubert A, Leysen L, et al. Central pain modulation in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders. PAIN Research Meeting, Abstracts. 2017. p. 30–30.
IEEE
[1]
R. Pas et al., “Central pain modulation in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders,” in PAIN Research Meeting, Abstracts, Antwerp, Belgium, 2017, pp. 30–30.
@inproceedings{8566117,
  abstract     = {Based upon previous evidence for the presence of secondary hyperalgesia and altered cortical nociceptive processing, central sensitization (CS) might be present in children with pediatric abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders (AP-FGIDs). Still, indices of CS should be further investigated in order to provide firm evidence regarding its contribution in children with AP-FGIDs.
Aims: To compare indices of CS in children with AP-FGIDs versus healthy controls.
Methods: In this case-control study a total sample size of 66 children; 33 patients with AP-FGIDs and 33 healthy controls (6 - 12 years) will be studied. Patients will be recruited during medical examination by a pediatric specialist of the University Hospital of Antwerp. Healthy controls will be selected and matched with the patient group according to age, sex and socio-economic status. All participants will undergo experimental pain assessments to measure primary and secondary hyperalgesia (pressure pain thresholds at local and remote sites) and efficacy of endogenous pain inhibition (conditioned pain modulation). Furthermore, children’s self-reports of pain intensity and fear of pain, as well as parental reports of their child’s functional disabilities, parental catastrophic thinking, fear and avoidance behavior associated to their child’s pain will be measured.
Expected hypothesis: Children with AP-FGID’s are expected to show less efficient central pain modulation compared to healthy children. Preliminary results will be available and discussed during the congress.
Implications: Findings will have implications for a better understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms contributing to AP-FGID’s and may thus be helpful in the development of pain mechanism-based treatment strategies.},
  author       = {Pas, Roselien and Ickmans, Kelly and Van Oosterwijck, Sophie and Van der Cruyssen, Kelly and Foubert, Anthe and Leysen, Laurence and Nijs, Jo and Meeus, Mira},
  booktitle    = {PAIN Research Meeting, Abstracts},
  keywords     = {Pediatric pain,brain/central nervous system,pain assessment},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Antwerp, Belgium},
  pages        = {30--30},
  title        = {Central pain modulation in children with abdominal pain-related functional gastrointestinal disorders},
  year         = {2017},
}