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Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species

Stephanie Schelfhout (UGent) , An De Schrijver (UGent) , Kris Verheyen (UGent) , Robbe De Beelde (UGent) , Geert Haesaert (UGent) and Jan Mertens (UGent)
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Abstract
High soil P concentrations hinder ecological restoration of biological communities typical for nutrient-poor soils. Phosphorus mining, i.e., growing crops with fertilization other than P, might reduce soil P concentrations. However, crop species have different P-uptake rates and can affect subsequent P removal in crop rotation, both of which may also vary with soil P concentration. In a pot experiment with three soil-P-levels (High-P: 125-155 mg P-Olsen/kg; Mid-P: 51-70 mg P-Olsen/kg; Low-P: 6-21 mg P-Olsen/kg), we measured how much P was removed by five crop species (buckwheat, maize, sunflower, flax, and triticale). Total P removal decreased with soil-P-level and depended upon crop identity. Buckwheat and maize removed most P from High-P and Mid-P soils and triticale removed less P than buckwheat, maize, and sunflower at every soil-P-level. The difference in P removal between crops was, however, almost absent in Low-P soils. Absolute and relative P removal with seeds depended upon crop species and, for maize and triticale, also upon soil-P-level. None of the previously grown crop species significantly affected P removal by the follow-up crop (perennial ryegrass). We can conclude that for maximizing P removal, buckwheat or maize could be grown.
Keywords
Phytoextraction, P-mining, sustainable nutrient management, legacy soil phosphorus, crop rotation, FORMER AGRICULTURAL LAND, OLSEN P, SYSTEMS, RESTORATION, GRASSLANDS, MANAGEMENT, NITROGEN, AVAILABILITY, ACCUMULATION, STRATEGIES

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Chicago
Schelfhout, Stephanie, An De Schrijver, Kris Verheyen, Robbe De Beelde, Geert Haesaert, and Jan Mertens. 2018. “Phosphorus Mining Efficiency Declines with Decreasinq Soil P Concentration and Varies Across Crop Species.” International Journal of Phytoremediation 20 (9): 939–946.
APA
Schelfhout, S., De Schrijver, A., Verheyen, K., De Beelde, R., Haesaert, G., & Mertens, J. (2018). Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION, 20(9), 939–946.
Vancouver
1.
Schelfhout S, De Schrijver A, Verheyen K, De Beelde R, Haesaert G, Mertens J. Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION. 2018;20(9):939–46.
MLA
Schelfhout, Stephanie, An De Schrijver, Kris Verheyen, et al. “Phosphorus Mining Efficiency Declines with Decreasinq Soil P Concentration and Varies Across Crop Species.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION 20.9 (2018): 939–946. Print.
@article{8565115,
  abstract     = {High soil P concentrations hinder ecological restoration of biological communities typical for nutrient-poor soils. Phosphorus mining, i.e., growing crops with fertilization other than P, might reduce soil P concentrations. However, crop species have different P-uptake rates and can affect subsequent P removal in crop rotation, both of which may also vary with soil P concentration. In a pot experiment with three soil-P-levels (High-P: 125-155 mg P-Olsen/kg; Mid-P: 51-70 mg P-Olsen/kg; Low-P: 6-21 mg P-Olsen/kg), we measured how much P was removed by five crop species (buckwheat, maize, sunflower, flax, and triticale). Total P removal decreased with soil-P-level and depended upon crop identity. Buckwheat and maize removed most P from High-P and Mid-P soils and triticale removed less P than buckwheat, maize, and sunflower at every soil-P-level. The difference in P removal between crops was, however, almost absent in Low-P soils. Absolute and relative P removal with seeds depended upon crop species and, for maize and triticale, also upon soil-P-level. None of the previously grown crop species significantly affected P removal by the follow-up crop (perennial ryegrass). We can conclude that for maximizing P removal, buckwheat or maize could be grown.},
  author       = {Schelfhout, Stephanie and De Schrijver, An and Verheyen, Kris and De Beelde, Robbe and Haesaert, Geert and Mertens, Jan},
  issn         = {1522-6514},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION},
  keyword      = {Phytoextraction,P-mining,sustainable nutrient management,legacy soil phosphorus,crop rotation,FORMER AGRICULTURAL LAND,OLSEN P,SYSTEMS,RESTORATION,GRASSLANDS,MANAGEMENT,NITROGEN,AVAILABILITY,ACCUMULATION,STRATEGIES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {939--946},
  title        = {Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15226514.2018.1448363},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2018},
}

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