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Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species

Stephanie Schelfhout (UGent) , An De Schrijver (UGent) , Kris Verheyen (UGent) , Robbe De Beelde (UGent) , Geert Haesaert (UGent) and Jan Mertens (UGent)
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Abstract
High soil P concentrations hinder ecological restoration of biological communities typical for nutrient-poor soils. Phosphorus mining, i.e., growing crops with fertilization other than P, might reduce soil P concentrations. However, crop species have different P-uptake rates and can affect subsequent P removal in crop rotation, both of which may also vary with soil P concentration. In a pot experiment with three soil-P-levels (High-P: 125-155 mg P-Olsen/kg; Mid-P: 51-70 mg P-Olsen/kg; Low-P: 6-21 mg P-Olsen/kg), we measured how much P was removed by five crop species (buckwheat, maize, sunflower, flax, and triticale). Total P removal decreased with soil-P-level and depended upon crop identity. Buckwheat and maize removed most P from High-P and Mid-P soils and triticale removed less P than buckwheat, maize, and sunflower at every soil-P-level. The difference in P removal between crops was, however, almost absent in Low-P soils. Absolute and relative P removal with seeds depended upon crop species and, for maize and triticale, also upon soil-P-level. None of the previously grown crop species significantly affected P removal by the follow-up crop (perennial ryegrass). We can conclude that for maximizing P removal, buckwheat or maize could be grown.
Keywords
Phytoextraction, P-mining, sustainable nutrient management, legacy soil phosphorus, crop rotation, FORMER AGRICULTURAL LAND, OLSEN P, SYSTEMS, RESTORATION, GRASSLANDS, MANAGEMENT, NITROGEN, AVAILABILITY, ACCUMULATION, STRATEGIES

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MLA
Schelfhout, Stephanie et al. “Phosphorus Mining Efficiency Declines with Decreasinq Soil P Concentration and Varies Across Crop Species.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION 20.9 (2018): 939–946. Print.
APA
Schelfhout, Stephanie, De Schrijver, A., Verheyen, K., De Beelde, R., Haesaert, G., & Mertens, J. (2018). Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION, 20(9), 939–946.
Chicago author-date
Schelfhout, Stephanie, An De Schrijver, Kris Verheyen, Robbe De Beelde, Geert Haesaert, and Jan Mertens. 2018. “Phosphorus Mining Efficiency Declines with Decreasinq Soil P Concentration and Varies Across Crop Species.” International Journal of Phytoremediation 20 (9): 939–946.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Schelfhout, Stephanie, An De Schrijver, Kris Verheyen, Robbe De Beelde, Geert Haesaert, and Jan Mertens. 2018. “Phosphorus Mining Efficiency Declines with Decreasinq Soil P Concentration and Varies Across Crop Species.” International Journal of Phytoremediation 20 (9): 939–946.
Vancouver
1.
Schelfhout S, De Schrijver A, Verheyen K, De Beelde R, Haesaert G, Mertens J. Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION. 2018;20(9):939–46.
IEEE
[1]
S. Schelfhout, A. De Schrijver, K. Verheyen, R. De Beelde, G. Haesaert, and J. Mertens, “Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION, vol. 20, no. 9, pp. 939–946, 2018.
@article{8565115,
  abstract     = {High soil P concentrations hinder ecological restoration of biological communities typical for nutrient-poor soils. Phosphorus mining, i.e., growing crops with fertilization other than P, might reduce soil P concentrations. However, crop species have different P-uptake rates and can affect subsequent P removal in crop rotation, both of which may also vary with soil P concentration. In a pot experiment with three soil-P-levels (High-P: 125-155 mg P-Olsen/kg; Mid-P: 51-70 mg P-Olsen/kg; Low-P: 6-21 mg P-Olsen/kg), we measured how much P was removed by five crop species (buckwheat, maize, sunflower, flax, and triticale). Total P removal decreased with soil-P-level and depended upon crop identity. Buckwheat and maize removed most P from High-P and Mid-P soils and triticale removed less P than buckwheat, maize, and sunflower at every soil-P-level. The difference in P removal between crops was, however, almost absent in Low-P soils. Absolute and relative P removal with seeds depended upon crop species and, for maize and triticale, also upon soil-P-level. None of the previously grown crop species significantly affected P removal by the follow-up crop (perennial ryegrass). We can conclude that for maximizing P removal, buckwheat or maize could be grown.},
  author       = {Schelfhout, Stephanie and De Schrijver, An and Verheyen, Kris and De Beelde, Robbe and Haesaert, Geert and Mertens, Jan},
  issn         = {1522-6514},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF PHYTOREMEDIATION},
  keywords     = {Phytoextraction,P-mining,sustainable nutrient management,legacy soil phosphorus,crop rotation,FORMER AGRICULTURAL LAND,OLSEN P,SYSTEMS,RESTORATION,GRASSLANDS,MANAGEMENT,NITROGEN,AVAILABILITY,ACCUMULATION,STRATEGIES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {9},
  pages        = {939--946},
  title        = {Phosphorus mining efficiency declines with decreasinq soil P concentration and varies across crop species},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/15226514.2018.1448363},
  volume       = {20},
  year         = {2018},
}

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