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Does context really collapse in social media interaction?

(2020) APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW. 11(2). p.251-279
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Abstract
'Context collapse' (CC) refers to the phenomenon widely debated in social media research, where various audiences convene around single communicative acts in new networked publics, causing confusion and anxiety among social media users. The notion of CC is a key one in the reimagination of social life as a consequence of the mediation technologies we associate with the Web 2.0. CC is undertheorized, and in this paper we intend not to rebuke it but to explore its limits. We do so by shifting the analytical focus from "online communication" in general to specific forms of social action performed, not by predefined "group" members, but by actors engaging in emerging kinds of sharedness based on existing norms of interaction. This approach is a radical choice for action rather than actor, reaching back to symbolic interactionism and beyond to Mead, Strauss and other interactionist sociologists, and inspired by contemporary linguistic ethnography and interactional sociolinguistics, notably the work of Rampton and the Goodwins. We apply this approach to an extraordinarily complex Facebook discussion among Polish people residing in The Netherlands - a set of data that could instantly be selected as a likely site for context collapse. We shall analyze fragments in detail, showing how, in spite of the complications intrinsic to such online, profoundly mediated and oddly 'placed' interaction events, participants appear capable of 'normal' modes of interaction and participant selection. In fact, the 'networked publics' rarely seem to occur in practice, and contexts do not collapse but expand continuously without causing major issues for contextualization. The analysis will offer a vocabulary and methodology for addressing the complexities of the largest new social space on earth: the space of online culture.
Keywords
context collapse, social action, analysis of interaction, symbolic interactionism, Facebook discussion, PRIVACY

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MLA
Szabla, Malgorzata, and Jan Blommaert. “Does Context Really Collapse in Social Media Interaction?” APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW, vol. 11, no. 2, 2020, pp. 251–79, doi:10.1515/applirev-2017-0119.
APA
Szabla, M., & Blommaert, J. (2020). Does context really collapse in social media interaction? APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW, 11(2), 251–279. https://doi.org/10.1515/applirev-2017-0119
Chicago author-date
Szabla, Malgorzata, and Jan Blommaert. 2020. “Does Context Really Collapse in Social Media Interaction?” APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW 11 (2): 251–79. https://doi.org/10.1515/applirev-2017-0119.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Szabla, Malgorzata, and Jan Blommaert. 2020. “Does Context Really Collapse in Social Media Interaction?” APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW 11 (2): 251–279. doi:10.1515/applirev-2017-0119.
Vancouver
1.
Szabla M, Blommaert J. Does context really collapse in social media interaction? APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW. 2020;11(2):251–79.
IEEE
[1]
M. Szabla and J. Blommaert, “Does context really collapse in social media interaction?,” APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW, vol. 11, no. 2, pp. 251–279, 2020.
@article{8564621,
  abstract     = {'Context collapse' (CC) refers to the phenomenon widely debated in social media research, where various audiences convene around single communicative acts in new networked publics, causing confusion and anxiety among social media users. The notion of CC is a key one in the reimagination of social life as a consequence of the mediation technologies we associate with the Web 2.0. CC is undertheorized, and in this paper we intend not to rebuke it but to explore its limits. We do so by shifting the analytical focus from "online communication" in general to specific forms of social action performed, not by predefined "group" members, but by actors engaging in emerging kinds of sharedness based on existing norms of interaction. This approach is a radical choice for action rather than actor, reaching back to symbolic interactionism and beyond to Mead, Strauss and other interactionist sociologists, and inspired by contemporary linguistic ethnography and interactional sociolinguistics, notably the work of Rampton and the Goodwins. We apply this approach to an extraordinarily complex Facebook discussion among Polish people residing in The Netherlands - a set of data that could instantly be selected as a likely site for context collapse. We shall analyze fragments in detail, showing how, in spite of the complications intrinsic to such online, profoundly mediated and oddly 'placed' interaction events, participants appear capable of 'normal' modes of interaction and participant selection. In fact, the 'networked publics' rarely seem to occur in practice, and contexts do not collapse but expand continuously without causing major issues for contextualization. The analysis will offer a vocabulary and methodology for addressing the complexities of the largest new social space on earth: the space of online culture.},
  author       = {Szabla, Malgorzata and Blommaert, Jan},
  issn         = {1868-6303},
  journal      = {APPLIED LINGUISTICS REVIEW},
  keywords     = {context collapse,social action,analysis of interaction,symbolic interactionism,Facebook discussion,PRIVACY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {2},
  pages        = {251--279},
  title        = {Does context really collapse in social media interaction?},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/applirev-2017-0119},
  volume       = {11},
  year         = {2020},
}

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