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Don’t judge me : psychophysiological evidence of gender differences to social evaluative feedback

Marie-Anne Vanderhasselt (UGent) , Rudi De Raedt (UGent) , Selene Nasso (UGent) , Louise Puttevils (UGent) and Sven Müller (UGent)
(2018) BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. 135. p.29-35
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Abstract
Human beings have a basic need for esteemed social connections, and receiving negative self-evaluative feedback induces emotional distress. The aim of the current study is to measure eye movements (a physiological marker of attention allocation) and pupillary responses (a physiological marker of cognitive and emotional processing) as online and objective indices of participants' reaction to positive/negative social evaluations from the same or opposite sex. Following the paradigm, subjective mood ratings and heart rate variability (HRV) - as an objective index of regulatory effort-were measured. Results demonstrate clear gender-specific results in all measures. Eye-movements demonstrate that male participants respond more with other-focused attention (and specifically to male participants), whereas women respond more with self-focused attention following negative social evaluative feedback. Pupillary responses show that social evaluative feedback is specifically eliciting cognitive/affective processes in male participants to regulate emotional responses when provided by the opposite gender. Finally, following the paradigm, female (as compared to male) participants were more subjectively reactive to the paradigm (i.e., self-reports), and were less able to engage contextual-and goal related regulatory control of emotional responses (reduced HRV). Although the current study focused on psychiatrically healthy young adults, results may contribute to our understanding of sex differences in internalizing mental problems, such as rumination.
Keywords
Social feedback, Gender differences, Heart rate variability, Eye movement, Pupil dilation, HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY, EMOTION REGULATION, NEGATIVE AFFECT, SEX-DIFFERENCES, OLDER-ADULTS, EXCLUSION, REJECTION, RESPONSES, STRESS, ACTIVATION

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Citation

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Chicago
Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne, Rudi De Raedt, Selene Nasso, Louise Puttevils, and Sven Müller. 2018. “Don’t Judge Me : Psychophysiological Evidence of Gender Differences to Social Evaluative Feedback.” Biological Psychology 135: 29–35.
APA
Vanderhasselt, M.-A., De Raedt, R., Nasso, S., Puttevils, L., & Müller, S. (2018). Don’t judge me : psychophysiological evidence of gender differences to social evaluative feedback. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY, 135, 29–35.
Vancouver
1.
Vanderhasselt M-A, De Raedt R, Nasso S, Puttevils L, Müller S. Don’t judge me : psychophysiological evidence of gender differences to social evaluative feedback. BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY. 2018;135:29–35.
MLA
Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne, Rudi De Raedt, Selene Nasso, et al. “Don’t Judge Me : Psychophysiological Evidence of Gender Differences to Social Evaluative Feedback.” BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY 135 (2018): 29–35. Print.
@article{8564139,
  abstract     = {Human beings have a basic need for esteemed social connections, and receiving negative self-evaluative feedback induces emotional distress. The aim of the current study is to measure eye movements (a physiological marker of attention allocation) and pupillary responses (a physiological marker of cognitive and emotional processing) as online and objective indices of participants' reaction to positive/negative social evaluations from the same or opposite sex. Following the paradigm, subjective mood ratings and heart rate variability (HRV) - as an objective index of regulatory effort-were measured. Results demonstrate clear gender-specific results in all measures. Eye-movements demonstrate that male participants respond more with other-focused attention (and specifically to male participants), whereas women respond more with self-focused attention following negative social evaluative feedback. Pupillary responses show that social evaluative feedback is specifically eliciting cognitive/affective processes in male participants to regulate emotional responses when provided by the opposite gender. Finally, following the paradigm, female (as compared to male) participants were more subjectively reactive to the paradigm (i.e., self-reports), and were less able to engage contextual-and goal related regulatory control of emotional responses (reduced HRV). Although the current study focused on psychiatrically healthy young adults, results may contribute to our understanding of sex differences in internalizing mental problems, such as rumination.},
  author       = {Vanderhasselt, Marie-Anne and De Raedt, Rudi and Nasso, Selene and Puttevils, Louise and M{\"u}ller, Sven},
  issn         = {0301-0511},
  journal      = {BIOLOGICAL PSYCHOLOGY},
  keyword      = {Social feedback,Gender differences,Heart rate variability,Eye movement,Pupil dilation,HEART-RATE-VARIABILITY,EMOTION REGULATION,NEGATIVE AFFECT,SEX-DIFFERENCES,OLDER-ADULTS,EXCLUSION,REJECTION,RESPONSES,STRESS,ACTIVATION},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {29--35},
  title        = {Don{\textquoteright}t judge me : psychophysiological evidence of gender differences to social evaluative feedback},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biopsycho.2018.02.017},
  volume       = {135},
  year         = {2018},
}

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