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The nomological network of emotion recognition ability evidence from the Geneva emotion recognition test

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Abstract
The ability to recognize other people's emotions from their face, voice, and body (emotion recognition ability, ERA) is crucial to successful functioning in private and professional life. The Geneva Emotion Recognition Test (GERT, Schlegel, Grandjean, & Scherer, 2014) is a new instrument to measure ERA in a more ecologically valid way than previous tests. In this article, we report the results of five studies examining the test's construct validity with a total N of 1,284. We found that the GERT was highly positively correlated with other performance-based tests measuring ERA and emotional intelligence (El), as welt as with cognitive intelligence. GERT scores were also related to higher self-reported empathy, openness, and neuroticism, and to better social adjustment. Furthermore, higher GERT scores were related to lower anxiety, anger expressivity, and alexithymia. In line with previous findings, women scored higher than men and GERT performance declined with increasing age. Taken together, these results provide considerable evidence for the construct validity of the GERT and for ERA as an adaptive skill that likely facilitates better life outcomes.
Keywords
TORONTO-ALEXITHYMIA-SCALE, PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES, INTELLIGENCE QUESTIONNAIRE, EXPRESSIONS, VALIDATION, VALIDITY, RELIABILITY, SENSITIVITY, ADAPTATION, INVENTORY, emotion recognition, construct validity, assessment, emotional intelligence, test

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MLA
Schlegel, Katja, et al. “The Nomological Network of Emotion Recognition Ability Evidence from the Geneva Emotion Recognition Test.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT, vol. 35, no. 3, 2019, pp. 352–63, doi:10.1027/1015-5759/a000396.
APA
Schlegel, K., Fontaine, J., & Scherer, K. R. (2019). The nomological network of emotion recognition ability evidence from the Geneva emotion recognition test. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT, 35(3), 352–363. https://doi.org/10.1027/1015-5759/a000396
Chicago author-date
Schlegel, Katja, Johnny Fontaine, and Klaus R. Scherer. 2019. “The Nomological Network of Emotion Recognition Ability Evidence from the Geneva Emotion Recognition Test.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT 35 (3): 352–63. https://doi.org/10.1027/1015-5759/a000396.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Schlegel, Katja, Johnny Fontaine, and Klaus R. Scherer. 2019. “The Nomological Network of Emotion Recognition Ability Evidence from the Geneva Emotion Recognition Test.” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT 35 (3): 352–363. doi:10.1027/1015-5759/a000396.
Vancouver
1.
Schlegel K, Fontaine J, Scherer KR. The nomological network of emotion recognition ability evidence from the Geneva emotion recognition test. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT. 2019;35(3):352–63.
IEEE
[1]
K. Schlegel, J. Fontaine, and K. R. Scherer, “The nomological network of emotion recognition ability evidence from the Geneva emotion recognition test,” EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT, vol. 35, no. 3, pp. 352–363, 2019.
@article{8561516,
  abstract     = {{The ability to recognize other people's emotions from their face, voice, and body (emotion recognition ability, ERA) is crucial to successful functioning in private and professional life. The Geneva Emotion Recognition Test (GERT, Schlegel, Grandjean, & Scherer, 2014) is a new instrument to measure ERA in a more ecologically valid way than previous tests. In this article, we report the results of five studies examining the test's construct validity with a total N of 1,284. We found that the GERT was highly positively correlated with other performance-based tests measuring ERA and emotional intelligence (El), as welt as with cognitive intelligence. GERT scores were also related to higher self-reported empathy, openness, and neuroticism, and to better social adjustment. Furthermore, higher GERT scores were related to lower anxiety, anger expressivity, and alexithymia. In line with previous findings, women scored higher than men and GERT performance declined with increasing age. Taken together, these results provide considerable evidence for the construct validity of the GERT and for ERA as an adaptive skill that likely facilitates better life outcomes.}},
  author       = {{Schlegel, Katja and Fontaine, Johnny and Scherer, Klaus R.}},
  issn         = {{1015-5759}},
  journal      = {{EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT}},
  keywords     = {{TORONTO-ALEXITHYMIA-SCALE,PSYCHOMETRIC PROPERTIES,INTELLIGENCE QUESTIONNAIRE,EXPRESSIONS,VALIDATION,VALIDITY,RELIABILITY,SENSITIVITY,ADAPTATION,INVENTORY,emotion recognition,construct validity,assessment,emotional intelligence,test}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{3}},
  pages        = {{352--363}},
  title        = {{The nomological network of emotion recognition ability evidence from the Geneva emotion recognition test}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1027/1015-5759/a000396}},
  volume       = {{35}},
  year         = {{2019}},
}

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