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DNA adduct profiling of in vitro colonic meat digests to map red vs. white meat genotoxicity

Lieselot Hemeryck (UGent) , Caroline Rombouts (UGent) , Ellen De Paepe (UGent) and Lynn Vanhaecke (UGent)
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Abstract
The consumption of red meat has been linked to an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. One of the major hypotheses states that heme iron (present in red meat) stimulates the formation of genotoxic N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) and lipid peroxidation products (LPOs). By means of DNA adductomics, chemically induced DNA adduct formation can be mapped in relation to e.g. dietary exposures. In this study, this state-of-the-art methodology was used to investigate alkylation and (lipid per)oxidation induced DNA adduct formation in in vitro red vs. white meat digests. In doing so, 90 alkylation and (lipid per)oxidation induced DNA adduct types could be (tentatively) identified. Overall, 12 NOC- and/or LPO-related DNA adduct types, i.e. dimethyl-T (or ethyl-T), hydroxymethyl-T, tetramethyl-T, methylguanine (MeG), guanidinohydantoin, hydroxybutyl-C, hydroxymethylhydantoin, malondialdehyde-x3-C, O-6-carboxymethylguanine, hydroxyethyl-T, carboxyethyl-T and 3,N-4-etheno-C were singled out as potential heme-rich meat digestion markers. The retrieval of these DNA adduct markets is in support of the heme, NOC and LPO hypotheses, suggesting that DNA adduct formation may indeed contribute to red meat related CRC risk.
Keywords
Cancer risk, DNA adductome mapping, Heme, Red meat, HUMAN P53 GENE, COLORECTAL-CANCER, ENDOGENOUS NITROSATION, MASS-SPECTROMETRY, DIETARY MEAT, FECAL WATER, LARGE-BOWEL, CELL LINES, DAMAGE, REPAIR

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Chicago
Hemeryck, Lieselot, Caroline Rombouts, Ellen De Paepe, and Lynn Vanhaecke. 2018. “DNA Adduct Profiling of in Vitro Colonic Meat Digests to Map Red Vs. White Meat Genotoxicity.” Food and Chemical Toxicology 115: 73–87.
APA
Hemeryck, L., Rombouts, C., De Paepe, E., & Vanhaecke, L. (2018). DNA adduct profiling of in vitro colonic meat digests to map red vs. white meat genotoxicity. FOOD AND CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY, 115, 73–87.
Vancouver
1.
Hemeryck L, Rombouts C, De Paepe E, Vanhaecke L. DNA adduct profiling of in vitro colonic meat digests to map red vs. white meat genotoxicity. FOOD AND CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY. 2018;115:73–87.
MLA
Hemeryck, Lieselot, Caroline Rombouts, Ellen De Paepe, et al. “DNA Adduct Profiling of in Vitro Colonic Meat Digests to Map Red Vs. White Meat Genotoxicity.” FOOD AND CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY 115 (2018): 73–87. Print.
@article{8561341,
  abstract     = {The consumption of red meat has been linked to an increased colorectal cancer (CRC) risk. One of the major hypotheses states that heme iron (present in red meat) stimulates the formation of genotoxic N-nitroso compounds (NOCs) and lipid peroxidation products (LPOs). By means of DNA adductomics, chemically induced DNA adduct formation can be mapped in relation to e.g. dietary exposures. In this study, this state-of-the-art methodology was used to investigate alkylation and (lipid per)oxidation induced DNA adduct formation in in vitro red vs. white meat digests. In doing so, 90 alkylation and (lipid per)oxidation induced DNA adduct types could be (tentatively) identified. Overall, 12 NOC- and/or LPO-related DNA adduct types, i.e. dimethyl-T (or ethyl-T), hydroxymethyl-T, tetramethyl-T, methylguanine (MeG), guanidinohydantoin, hydroxybutyl-C, hydroxymethylhydantoin, malondialdehyde-x3-C, O-6-carboxymethylguanine, hydroxyethyl-T, carboxyethyl-T and 3,N-4-etheno-C were singled out as potential heme-rich meat digestion markers. The retrieval of these DNA adduct markets is in support of the heme, NOC and LPO hypotheses, suggesting that DNA adduct formation may indeed contribute to red meat related CRC risk.},
  author       = {Hemeryck, Lieselot and Rombouts, Caroline and De Paepe, Ellen and Vanhaecke, Lynn},
  issn         = {0278-6915},
  journal      = {FOOD AND CHEMICAL TOXICOLOGY},
  keywords     = {Cancer risk,DNA adductome mapping,Heme,Red meat,HUMAN P53 GENE,COLORECTAL-CANCER,ENDOGENOUS NITROSATION,MASS-SPECTROMETRY,DIETARY MEAT,FECAL WATER,LARGE-BOWEL,CELL LINES,DAMAGE,REPAIR},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {73--87},
  title        = {DNA adduct profiling of in vitro colonic meat digests to map red vs. white meat genotoxicity},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2018.02.032},
  volume       = {115},
  year         = {2018},
}

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