Advanced search
1 file | 270.71 KB

Characterization of cefotaxime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant commensal Escherichia coli originating from Belgian farm animals indicates high antibiotic resistance transfer rates

Author
Organization
Abstract
Food-producing animals represent one of the sources of antibiotic resistant commensal bacteria. There is an increasing awareness that these bacteria might have the potential to transfer their resistance genes to other (pathogenic) bacteria. In this study, 50 commensal Escherichia coli strains originating from food-producing animals and resistant to the highest priority, critically important antibiotics cefotaxime and/or ciprofloxacin, were selected for further characterization. For each strain (i) an antibiogram, (ii) the phylogenetic group, (iii) plasmid replicon type, (iv) presence and identification of integrons, and (v) antibiotic resistance transfer ratios were determined. Forty-five of these strains were resistant to 5 or more antibiotics, and 6 strains were resistant to 10 or more antibiotics. Resistance was most common to ampicillin (100%), sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin (82%), trimethoprim, tetracycline (74%), cefotaxime, (70%) and ceftazidime (62%). Phylogenetic groups A (62%) and B1 (26%) were most common, followed by C (8%) and E (4%). In 43 strains, more than 1 replicon type was detected, with FII (88%), FIB (70%), and I1 (48%) being the most encountered types. Forty strains, positive for integrons, all harbored a class I integron and seven of them contained an additional class II integron. No class III integrons were detected. The antibiotic resistance transfer was assessed by liquid mating experiments. The transfer ratio, expressed as the number of transconjugants per recipient, was between 10(-5) and 10(0) for cefotaxime resistance and between 10(-7) and 10(-1) for ciprofloxacin resistance. The results of the current study prove that commensal E. coli in food-production animals can be a source of multiple resistance genes and that these bacteria can easily spread their ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime resistance.
Keywords
FOOD-PRODUCING ANIMALS, ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE, GENE CASSETTES, PHYLOGENETIC GROUPS, 2 INTEGRONS, PLASMIDS, PREVALENCE, ANCIENT, CEPHALOSPORINS, IDENTIFICATION, cefotaxime, ciprofloxacin, transfer ratio, resistance, commensal E, coli

Downloads

    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 270.71 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Lambrecht, Ellen, Eva Van Meervenne, Nico Boon, Tom Van de Wiele, Pierre Wattiau, Lieve Herman, Marc Heyndrickx, and Els Van Coillie. 2017. “Characterization of Cefotaxime- and Ciprofloxacin-resistant Commensal Escherichia Coli Originating from Belgian Farm Animals Indicates High Antibiotic Resistance Transfer Rates.” Microbial Drug Resistance.
APA
Lambrecht, Ellen, Van Meervenne, E., Boon, N., Van de Wiele, T., Wattiau, P., Herman, L., Heyndrickx, M., et al. (2017). Characterization of cefotaxime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant commensal Escherichia coli originating from Belgian farm animals indicates high antibiotic resistance transfer rates. MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE.
Vancouver
1.
Lambrecht E, Van Meervenne E, Boon N, Van de Wiele T, Wattiau P, Herman L, et al. Characterization of cefotaxime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant commensal Escherichia coli originating from Belgian farm animals indicates high antibiotic resistance transfer rates. MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE. 2017;
MLA
Lambrecht, Ellen, Eva Van Meervenne, Nico Boon, et al. “Characterization of Cefotaxime- and Ciprofloxacin-resistant Commensal Escherichia Coli Originating from Belgian Farm Animals Indicates High Antibiotic Resistance Transfer Rates.” MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE (2017): n. pag. Print.
@article{8560339,
  abstract     = {Food-producing animals represent one of the sources of antibiotic resistant commensal bacteria. There is an increasing awareness that these bacteria might have the potential to transfer their resistance genes to other (pathogenic) bacteria. In this study, 50 commensal Escherichia coli strains originating from food-producing animals and resistant to the highest priority, critically important antibiotics cefotaxime and/or ciprofloxacin, were selected for further characterization. For each strain (i) an antibiogram, (ii) the phylogenetic group, (iii) plasmid replicon type, (iv) presence and identification of integrons, and (v) antibiotic resistance transfer ratios were determined. Forty-five of these strains were resistant to 5 or more antibiotics, and 6 strains were resistant to 10 or more antibiotics. Resistance was most common to ampicillin (100\%), sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin (82\%), trimethoprim, tetracycline (74\%), cefotaxime, (70\%) and ceftazidime (62\%). Phylogenetic groups A (62\%) and B1 (26\%) were most common, followed by C (8\%) and E (4\%). In 43 strains, more than 1 replicon type was detected, with FII (88\%), FIB (70\%), and I1 (48\%) being the most encountered types. Forty strains, positive for integrons, all harbored a class I integron and seven of them contained an additional class II integron. No class III integrons were detected. The antibiotic resistance transfer was assessed by liquid mating experiments. The transfer ratio, expressed as the number of transconjugants per recipient, was between 10(-5) and 10(0) for cefotaxime resistance and between 10(-7) and 10(-1) for ciprofloxacin resistance. The results of the current study prove that commensal E. coli in food-production animals can be a source of multiple resistance genes and that these bacteria can easily spread their ciprofloxacin and cefotaxime resistance.},
  author       = {Lambrecht, Ellen and Van Meervenne, Eva and Boon, Nico and Van de Wiele, Tom and Wattiau, Pierre and Herman, Lieve and Heyndrickx, Marc and Van Coillie, Els},
  issn         = {1076-6294},
  journal      = {MICROBIAL DRUG RESISTANCE},
  keyword      = {FOOD-PRODUCING ANIMALS,ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE,GENE CASSETTES,PHYLOGENETIC GROUPS,2 INTEGRONS,PLASMIDS,PREVALENCE,ANCIENT,CEPHALOSPORINS,IDENTIFICATION,cefotaxime,ciprofloxacin,transfer ratio,resistance,commensal E,coli},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {11},
  title        = {Characterization of cefotaxime- and ciprofloxacin-resistant commensal Escherichia coli originating from Belgian farm animals indicates high antibiotic resistance transfer rates},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1089/mdr.2017.0226},
  year         = {2017},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: