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Microbial inactivation efficiency of supercritical CO2 drying process

(2018) DRYING TECHNOLOGY. 36(16). p.2016-2021
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Abstract
Conventional drying of spices, as hot air treatment, often needs an additional downstream inactivation step to decrease the microbial load of the dried product and improve its microbial safety and microbial quality. In this regard, the present work explored the possibility to dry and decontaminate food in a single step using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) as a drying agent. A case study was focused on the drying of herbs and the antimicrobial effects were evaluated on the naturally present microbiota. For this purpose, experiments were carried out on coriander leaves using a high pressure vessel at 10 MPa, at two different temperatures (40 and 50 degrees C) with drying time of 0 and 150 min to establish the influence of each parameter on the microbial inactivation. Yeasts and molds appeared to be the least resistant to scCO(2) as they could never be detected after the treatment (<2 log CFU/g). Mesophilic bacteria were also significantly reduced, up to 4 log CFU/g, but remained above the limit of quantification. The quality of the dried product was comparable with the quality of air-dried samples in terms of phenolic constituents. Overall, the results indicated that scCO(2) drying was a promising green drying technique combining both drying and microbial inactivation in a single step with a relevant impact on safety and costs.
Keywords
Carbon dioxide, coriander, microorganism inactivation, supercritical drying, CARBON-DIOXIDE PASTEURIZATION, WATER ACTIVITY, HIGH-PRESSURE, FOOD QUALITY, SAFETY, CONTAMINATION, TECHNOLOGY, SPICES, CARROT, HERBS

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Citation

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MLA
Zambon, Alessandro, Filippo Michelino, Siméon Bourdoux, et al. “Microbial Inactivation Efficiency of Supercritical CO2 Drying Process.” DRYING TECHNOLOGY 36.16 (2018): 2016–2021. Print.
APA
Zambon, Alessandro, Michelino, F., Bourdoux, S., Devlieghere, F., Sut, S., Dall’Acqua, S., Rajkovic, A., et al. (2018). Microbial inactivation efficiency of supercritical CO2 drying process. DRYING TECHNOLOGY, 36(16), 2016–2021.
Chicago author-date
Zambon, Alessandro, Filippo Michelino, Siméon Bourdoux, Frank Devlieghere, Stefania Sut, Stefano Dall’Acqua, Andreja Rajkovic, and Sara Spilimbergo. 2018. “Microbial Inactivation Efficiency of Supercritical CO2 Drying Process.” Drying Technology 36 (16): 2016–2021.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Zambon, Alessandro, Filippo Michelino, Siméon Bourdoux, Frank Devlieghere, Stefania Sut, Stefano Dall’Acqua, Andreja Rajkovic, and Sara Spilimbergo. 2018. “Microbial Inactivation Efficiency of Supercritical CO2 Drying Process.” Drying Technology 36 (16): 2016–2021.
Vancouver
1.
Zambon A, Michelino F, Bourdoux S, Devlieghere F, Sut S, Dall’Acqua S, et al. Microbial inactivation efficiency of supercritical CO2 drying process. DRYING TECHNOLOGY. 2018;36(16):2016–21.
IEEE
[1]
A. Zambon et al., “Microbial inactivation efficiency of supercritical CO2 drying process,” DRYING TECHNOLOGY, vol. 36, no. 16, pp. 2016–2021, 2018.
@article{8559263,
  abstract     = {Conventional drying of spices, as hot air treatment, often needs an additional downstream inactivation step to decrease the microbial load of the dried product and improve its microbial safety and microbial quality. In this regard, the present work explored the possibility to dry and decontaminate food in a single step using supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)) as a drying agent. A case study was focused on the drying of herbs and the antimicrobial effects were evaluated on the naturally present microbiota. For this purpose, experiments were carried out on coriander leaves using a high pressure vessel at 10 MPa, at two different temperatures (40 and 50 degrees C) with drying time of 0 and 150 min to establish the influence of each parameter on the microbial inactivation. Yeasts and molds appeared to be the least resistant to scCO(2) as they could never be detected after the treatment (<2 log CFU/g). Mesophilic bacteria were also significantly reduced, up to 4 log CFU/g, but remained above the limit of quantification. The quality of the dried product was comparable with the quality of air-dried samples in terms of phenolic constituents. Overall, the results indicated that scCO(2) drying was a promising green drying technique combining both drying and microbial inactivation in a single step with a relevant impact on safety and costs.},
  author       = {Zambon, Alessandro and Michelino, Filippo and Bourdoux, Siméon and Devlieghere, Frank and Sut, Stefania and Dall’Acqua, Stefano and Rajkovic, Andreja and Spilimbergo, Sara},
  issn         = {0737-3937},
  journal      = {DRYING TECHNOLOGY},
  keywords     = {Carbon dioxide,coriander,microorganism inactivation,supercritical drying,CARBON-DIOXIDE PASTEURIZATION,WATER ACTIVITY,HIGH-PRESSURE,FOOD QUALITY,SAFETY,CONTAMINATION,TECHNOLOGY,SPICES,CARROT,HERBS},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {16},
  pages        = {2016--2021},
  title        = {Microbial inactivation efficiency of supercritical CO2 drying process},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/07373937.2018.1433683},
  volume       = {36},
  year         = {2018},
}

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