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Effect of mechanical stress on magnetic resonance imaging of the sacroiliac joints: assessment of military recruits by magnetic resonance imaging study

Gaëlle Varkas UGent, Manouk de Hooge UGent, Thomas Renson UGent, Sophie De Mits UGent, Philippe Carron UGent, Peggy Jacques UGent, Muriel Moris, Geert Souverijns, Lennart Jans UGent, Dirk Elewaut UGent, et al. (2018) RHEUMATOLOGY. 57(3). p.508-513
abstract
To assess the baseline condition of the SI joints (SIJs) in healthy individuals without symptoms of back pain and to study the effect of mechanical stress caused by intense physical training on MRI of the SIJs. Twenty-two military recruits underwent an MRI of the SIJs before and after 6 weeks of intense standardized physical training. Bone marrow oedema and structural lesions were scored based on the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) method, by three trained readers blinded for time sequence and clinical findings. Additionally, fulfilment of the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) definition of a positive MRI was evaluated. At baseline, 9/22 recruits (40.9%) already presented a SPARCC score a (c) 3/41; this number increased to 11/22 (50.0%) at week 6 (P = 0.625). In these patients, the mean (SD) SPARCC score was 2.4 (0.4) at baseline, compared to 3.7 (1.3) at week 6. Overall, the mean (SD) change in SPARCC score over time in all 22 patients was 0.9 (0.6) (P = 0.109). A positive MRI according to the ASAS definition was present in 5/22 recruits (22.7%) at baseline, which increased to 8/22 (36.4%) at follow-up (P = 0.375). Structural lesions were present in 6/22 subjects (27.3%), both at baseline and after 6 weeks of training. A substantial proportion of healthy active individuals without any symptoms of back pain displayed bone marrow oedema lesions on MRI at baseline. However, MRI lesions did not increase significantly after 6 weeks of intensive physical training. Our study underscores the necessity to interpret MRI findings of the SIJs in the appropriate clinical context, even in a young active population.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
BONE-MARROW EDEMA, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL, AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS, ANKYLOSING-SPONDYLITIS, BACK-PAIN, MARATHON RUNNERS, OSTEITIS PUBIS, INFLAMMATION, COHORT, SPINE
journal title
RHEUMATOLOGY
RHEUMATOLOGY
volume
57
issue
3
pages
6 pages
publisher
Oxford Univ Press
place of publication
Oxford
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000426814400017
ISSN
1462-0324
1462-0332
DOI
10.1093/rheumatology/kex491
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
U
id
8558252
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8558252
date created
2018-04-03 15:06:32
date last changed
2018-04-03 15:06:32
@article{8558252,
  abstract     = {To assess the baseline condition of the SI joints (SIJs) in healthy individuals without symptoms of back pain and to study the effect of mechanical stress caused by intense physical training on MRI of the SIJs. Twenty-two military recruits underwent an MRI of the SIJs before and after 6 weeks of intense standardized physical training. Bone marrow oedema and structural lesions were scored based on the Spondyloarthritis Research Consortium of Canada (SPARCC) method, by three trained readers blinded for time sequence and clinical findings. Additionally, fulfilment of the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) definition of a positive MRI was evaluated. At baseline, 9/22 recruits (40.9\%) already presented a SPARCC score a (c) 3/41; this number increased to 11/22 (50.0\%) at week 6 (P = 0.625). In these patients, the mean (SD) SPARCC score was 2.4 (0.4) at baseline, compared to 3.7 (1.3) at week 6. Overall, the mean (SD) change in SPARCC score over time in all 22 patients was 0.9 (0.6) (P = 0.109). A positive MRI according to the ASAS definition was present in 5/22 recruits (22.7\%) at baseline, which increased to 8/22 (36.4\%) at follow-up (P = 0.375). Structural lesions were present in 6/22 subjects (27.3\%), both at baseline and after 6 weeks of training. A substantial proportion of healthy active individuals without any symptoms of back pain displayed bone marrow oedema lesions on MRI at baseline. However, MRI lesions did not increase significantly after 6 weeks of intensive physical training. Our study underscores the necessity to interpret MRI findings of the SIJs in the appropriate clinical context, even in a young active population.},
  author       = {Varkas, Ga{\"e}lle and de Hooge, Manouk and Renson, Thomas and De Mits, Sophie and Carron, Philippe and Jacques, Peggy and Moris, Muriel and Souverijns, Geert and Jans, Lennart and Elewaut, Dirk and Van den Bosch, Filip},
  issn         = {1462-0324},
  journal      = {RHEUMATOLOGY},
  keyword      = {BONE-MARROW EDEMA,PLACEBO-CONTROLLED TRIAL,AXIAL SPONDYLOARTHRITIS,ANKYLOSING-SPONDYLITIS,BACK-PAIN,MARATHON RUNNERS,OSTEITIS PUBIS,INFLAMMATION,COHORT,SPINE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {508--513},
  publisher    = {Oxford Univ Press},
  title        = {Effect of mechanical stress on magnetic resonance imaging of the sacroiliac joints: assessment of military recruits by magnetic resonance imaging study},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1093/rheumatology/kex491},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2018},
}

Chicago
Varkas, Gaëlle, Manouk de Hooge, Thomas Renson, Sophie De Mits, Philippe Carron, Peggy Jacques, Muriel Moris, et al. 2018. “Effect of Mechanical Stress on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Sacroiliac Joints: Assessment of Military Recruits by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.” Rheumatology 57 (3): 508–513.
APA
Varkas, G., de Hooge, M., Renson, T., De Mits, S., Carron, P., Jacques, P., Moris, M., et al. (2018). Effect of mechanical stress on magnetic resonance imaging of the sacroiliac joints: assessment of military recruits by magnetic resonance imaging study. RHEUMATOLOGY, 57(3), 508–513.
Vancouver
1.
Varkas G, de Hooge M, Renson T, De Mits S, Carron P, Jacques P, et al. Effect of mechanical stress on magnetic resonance imaging of the sacroiliac joints: assessment of military recruits by magnetic resonance imaging study. RHEUMATOLOGY. Oxford: Oxford Univ Press; 2018;57(3):508–13.
MLA
Varkas, Gaëlle, Manouk de Hooge, Thomas Renson, et al. “Effect of Mechanical Stress on Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Sacroiliac Joints: Assessment of Military Recruits by Magnetic Resonance Imaging Study.” RHEUMATOLOGY 57.3 (2018): 508–513. Print.