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Benign biological interventions to reduce offending

(2020) NEUROETHICS. 13(1). p.29-41
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Abstract
A considerable body of evidence now documents, beyond reasonable doubt, biological and health risk factors for crime and violence. Nevertheless, intervention and prevention efforts with offenders have avoided biological interventions, in part due to past misuses of biological research and the challenges that biological predispositions to crime raise. This article reviews the empirical literature on two biological intervention approaches, omega-3 supplementation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Emerging research on these relatively benign interventions suggests that increased omega-3 intake through dietary intervention and prefrontal upregulation using non-invasive brain stimulation may show some initial promise in reducing antisocial behavior. The ethical issues related to mandated and offered biological interventions within the criminal justice system are discussed.
Keywords
Crime, Offending, Intervention, Ethics, Omega-3, Transcranial direct current stimulation, DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION, ESSENTIAL FATTY-ACIDS, DOUBLE-BLIND, ANTISOCIAL-BEHAVIOR, NEUROTECHNOLOGICAL TREATMENT, DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID, PERSONALITY-DISORDER, AGGRESSIVE-BEHAVIOR, SEAFOOD CONSUMPTION, CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Choy, Olivia, et al. “Benign Biological Interventions to Reduce Offending.” NEUROETHICS, vol. 13, no. 1, 2020, pp. 29–41.
APA
Choy, O., Focquaert, F., & Raine, A. (2020). Benign biological interventions to reduce offending. NEUROETHICS, 13(1), 29–41.
Chicago author-date
Choy, Olivia, Farah Focquaert, and Adrian Raine. 2020. “Benign Biological Interventions to Reduce Offending.” NEUROETHICS 13 (1): 29–41.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Choy, Olivia, Farah Focquaert, and Adrian Raine. 2020. “Benign Biological Interventions to Reduce Offending.” NEUROETHICS 13 (1): 29–41.
Vancouver
1.
Choy O, Focquaert F, Raine A. Benign biological interventions to reduce offending. NEUROETHICS. 2020;13(1):29–41.
IEEE
[1]
O. Choy, F. Focquaert, and A. Raine, “Benign biological interventions to reduce offending,” NEUROETHICS, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 29–41, 2020.
@article{8557989,
  abstract     = {A considerable body of evidence now documents, beyond reasonable doubt, biological and health risk factors for crime and violence. Nevertheless, intervention and prevention efforts with offenders have avoided biological interventions, in part due to past misuses of biological research and the challenges that biological predispositions to crime raise. This article reviews the empirical literature on two biological intervention approaches, omega-3 supplementation and transcranial direct current stimulation. Emerging research on these relatively benign interventions suggests that increased omega-3 intake through dietary intervention and prefrontal upregulation using non-invasive brain stimulation may show some initial promise in reducing antisocial behavior. The ethical issues related to mandated and offered biological interventions within the criminal justice system are discussed.},
  author       = {Choy, Olivia and Focquaert, Farah and Raine, Adrian},
  issn         = {1874-5490},
  journal      = {NEUROETHICS},
  keywords     = {Crime,Offending,Intervention,Ethics,Omega-3,Transcranial direct current stimulation,DIRECT-CURRENT STIMULATION,ESSENTIAL FATTY-ACIDS,DOUBLE-BLIND,ANTISOCIAL-BEHAVIOR,NEUROTECHNOLOGICAL TREATMENT,DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID,PERSONALITY-DISORDER,AGGRESSIVE-BEHAVIOR,SEAFOOD CONSUMPTION,CRIMINAL BEHAVIOR},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {29--41},
  title        = {Benign biological interventions to reduce offending},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s12152-018-9360-0},
  volume       = {13},
  year         = {2020},
}

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