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Student dropout and mobility, a chicken-and-egg-situation?

Emma Degroote (UGent) , Jannick Demanet (UGent) and Mieke Van Houtte (UGent)
(2018)
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Abstract
Transferring to another school or dropping out of education completely: the voluntary departure from a certain educational institution has considerable consequences not only for the student that makes the decision to leave, but also for the school and its student population in general. The objective of this article is to investigate the effects that dropout and mobility rates at the school level have on non-mobile students in terms of engagement and sense of belonging in school. Theoretically, this paper draws on peer effect research in dropout and mobility literature and on studies regarding the importance of social integration of students in school. Data was derived from thirty Ghentian schools, who took part in the International Study of City Youth-project (ISCY). Multilevel analysis was carried out to determine the effects of schools’ student dropout and mobility rates on engagement and sense of belonging of the non-mobile student population. Preliminary results show that non-mobile students exhibit lower levels of behavioral engagement in schools where there is a high inflow of mobile students. Moreover, their sense of belonging in school is negatively affected in schools with high levels of out-mobility. This effect, however, shows to be a composition effect, as it disappears when the schools’ socioeconomic composition is taken into account. In conclusion, this paper assesses if schools potentially get caught up in a vicious circle, in which high dropout and mobility rates of a school bring about lower levels of engagement and sense of belonging of non-mobile students, making those students in turn more vulnerable for negative educational decisions as dropping out or changing schools.

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MLA
Degroote, Emma, Jannick Demanet, and Mieke Van Houtte. “Student Dropout and Mobility, a Chicken-and-egg-situation? .” 2018. Print.
APA
Degroote, E., Demanet, J., & Van Houtte, M. (2018). Student dropout and mobility, a chicken-and-egg-situation? . Presented at the Final RESL.eu project conference .
Chicago author-date
Degroote, Emma, Jannick Demanet, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2018. “Student Dropout and Mobility, a Chicken-and-egg-situation? .” In .
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Degroote, Emma, Jannick Demanet, and Mieke Van Houtte. 2018. “Student Dropout and Mobility, a Chicken-and-egg-situation? .” In .
Vancouver
1.
Degroote E, Demanet J, Van Houtte M. Student dropout and mobility, a chicken-and-egg-situation? . 2018.
IEEE
[1]
E. Degroote, J. Demanet, and M. Van Houtte, “Student dropout and mobility, a chicken-and-egg-situation? ,” presented at the Final RESL.eu project conference , University of Antwerp, 2018.
@inproceedings{8556432,
  abstract     = {Transferring to another school or dropping out of education completely: the voluntary departure from a certain educational institution has considerable consequences not only for the student that makes the decision to leave, but also for the school and its student population in general. The objective of this article is to investigate the effects that dropout and mobility rates at the school level have on non-mobile students in terms of engagement and sense of belonging in school. Theoretically, this paper draws on peer effect research in dropout and mobility literature and on studies regarding the importance of social integration of students in school. Data was derived from thirty Ghentian schools, who took part in the International Study of City Youth-project (ISCY). Multilevel analysis was carried out to determine the effects of schools’ student dropout and mobility rates on engagement and sense of belonging of the non-mobile student population. Preliminary results show that non-mobile students exhibit lower levels of behavioral engagement in schools where there is a high inflow of mobile students. Moreover, their sense of belonging in school is negatively affected in schools with high levels of out-mobility. This effect, however, shows to be a composition effect, as it disappears when the schools’ socioeconomic composition is taken into account.  In conclusion, this paper assesses if schools potentially get caught up in a vicious circle, in which high dropout and mobility rates of a school bring about lower levels of engagement and sense of belonging of non-mobile students, making those students in turn more vulnerable for negative educational decisions as dropping out or changing schools. },
  author       = {Degroote, Emma and Demanet, Jannick and Van Houtte, Mieke},
  location     = {University of Antwerp},
  title        = {Student dropout and mobility, a chicken-and-egg-situation? },
  year         = {2018},
}