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The word frequency effect in word processing: an updated review

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Abstract
The word frequency effect refers to the observation that high-frequency words are processed more efficiently than low-frequency words. Although the effect was first described over 80 years ago, in recent years it has been investigated in more detail. It has become clear that considerable quality differences exist between frequency estimates and that we need a new standardized frequency measure that does not mislead users. Research also points to consistent individual differences in the word frequency effect, meaning that the effect will be present at different word frequency ranges for people with different degrees of language exposure. Finally, a few ongoing developments point to the importance of semantic diversity rather than mere differences in the number of times words have been encountered and to the importance of taking into account word prevalence in addition to word frequency.

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MLA
Brysbaert, Marc, et al. “The Word Frequency Effect in Word Processing: An Updated Review.” Current Directions in Psychological Science, vol. 27, no. 1, 2018, pp. 45–50, doi:10.1177/0963721417727521.
APA
Brysbaert, M., Mandera, P., & Keuleers, E. (2018). The word frequency effect in word processing: an updated review. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 27(1), 45–50. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721417727521
Chicago author-date
Brysbaert, Marc, Pawel Mandera, and Emmanuel Keuleers. 2018. “The Word Frequency Effect in Word Processing: An Updated Review.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 27 (1): 45–50. https://doi.org/10.1177/0963721417727521.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Brysbaert, Marc, Pawel Mandera, and Emmanuel Keuleers. 2018. “The Word Frequency Effect in Word Processing: An Updated Review.” Current Directions in Psychological Science 27 (1): 45–50. doi:10.1177/0963721417727521.
Vancouver
1.
Brysbaert M, Mandera P, Keuleers E. The word frequency effect in word processing: an updated review. Current directions in psychological science. 2018;27(1):45–50.
IEEE
[1]
M. Brysbaert, P. Mandera, and E. Keuleers, “The word frequency effect in word processing: an updated review,” Current directions in psychological science, vol. 27, no. 1, pp. 45–50, 2018.
@article{8555760,
  abstract     = {The word frequency effect refers to the observation that high-frequency words are processed more efficiently than low-frequency words. Although the effect was first described over 80 years ago, in recent years it has been investigated in more detail. It has become clear that considerable quality differences exist between frequency estimates and that we need a new standardized frequency measure that does not mislead users. Research also points to consistent individual differences in the word frequency effect, meaning that the effect will be present at different word frequency ranges for people with different degrees of language exposure. Finally, a few ongoing developments point to the importance of semantic diversity rather than mere differences in the number of times words have been encountered and to the importance of taking into account word prevalence in addition to word frequency.},
  author       = {Brysbaert, Marc and Mandera, Pawel and Keuleers, Emmanuel},
  issn         = {0963-7214},
  journal      = {Current directions in psychological science},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {45--50},
  title        = {The word frequency effect in word processing: an updated review},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0963721417727521},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2018},
}

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