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Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease

James H Cole, Jonathan Underwood, Matthan WA Caan, Davide De Francesco, Rosan A van Zoest, Robert Leech, Ferdinand WNM Wit, Peter Portegies, Gert J Geurtsen, Ben A Schmand, et al. (2017) NEUROLOGY. 88(14). p.1349-1357
abstract
Objective: To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. Methods: A large sample of virologically suppressed HIV-positive adults (n = 162, age 45-82 years) and highly comparable HIV-negative controls (n = 105) were recruited as part of the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) collaboration. Using T1-weighted MRI scans, a machinelearning model of healthy brain aging was defined in an independent cohort (n = 2,001, aged 1890 years). Neuroimaging data from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals were then used to estimate brain-predicted age; then brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD 5 brain-predicted brain age 2 chronological age) scores were calculated. Neuropsychological and clinical assessments were also carried out. Results: HIV-positive individuals had greater brain-PAD score (mean +/- SD 2.15 +/- 7.79 years) compared to HIV-negative individuals (20.87 +/- 8.40 years; b = 3.48, p < 0.01). Increased brainPAD score was associated with decreased performance in multiple cognitive domains (information processing speed, executive function, memory) and general cognitive performance across all participants. Brain-PAD score was not associated with age, duration of HIV infection, or other HIV-related measures. Conclusion: Increased apparent brain aging, predicted using neuroimaging, was observed in HIV-positive adults, despite effective viral suppression. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased apparent brain aging related to cognitive deficits. However, predicted brain age difference did not correlate with chronological age or duration of HIV infection, suggesting that HIV disease may accentuate rather than accelerate brain aging.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
COMBINATION ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY, IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS-INFECTION, AGE, MEN, INDIVIDUALS, COGNITION, COHORT, COMORBIDITIES, ASSOCIATION, PREMATURE
journal title
NEUROLOGY
Neurology
volume
88
issue
14
pages
1349 - 1357
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000398046100014
ISSN
0028-3878
1526-632X
DOI
10.1212/WNL.0000000000003790
language
English
UGent publication?
no
classification
A1
copyright statement
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0)
id
8555681
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8555681
date created
2018-03-14 16:07:24
date last changed
2018-05-15 13:10:18
@article{8555681,
  abstract     = {Objective: To establish whether HIV disease is associated with abnormal levels of age-related brain atrophy, by estimating apparent brain age using neuroimaging and exploring whether these estimates related to HIV status, age, cognitive performance, and HIV-related clinical parameters. 
Methods: A large sample of virologically suppressed HIV-positive adults (n = 162, age 45-82 years) and highly comparable HIV-negative controls (n = 105) were recruited as part of the Comorbidity in Relation to AIDS (COBRA) collaboration. Using T1-weighted MRI scans, a machinelearning model of healthy brain aging was defined in an independent cohort (n = 2,001, aged 1890 years). Neuroimaging data from HIV-positive and HIV-negative individuals were then used to estimate brain-predicted age; then brain-predicted age difference (brain-PAD 5 brain-predicted brain age 2 chronological age) scores were calculated. Neuropsychological and clinical assessments were also carried out. 
Results: HIV-positive individuals had greater brain-PAD score (mean +/- SD 2.15 +/- 7.79 years) compared to HIV-negative individuals (20.87 +/- 8.40 years; b = 3.48, p {\textlangle} 0.01). Increased brainPAD score was associated with decreased performance in multiple cognitive domains (information processing speed, executive function, memory) and general cognitive performance across all participants. Brain-PAD score was not associated with age, duration of HIV infection, or other HIV-related measures. 
Conclusion: Increased apparent brain aging, predicted using neuroimaging, was observed in HIV-positive adults, despite effective viral suppression. Furthermore, the magnitude of increased apparent brain aging related to cognitive deficits. However, predicted brain age difference did not correlate with chronological age or duration of HIV infection, suggesting that HIV disease may accentuate rather than accelerate brain aging.},
  author       = {Cole, James H and Underwood, Jonathan and Caan, Matthan WA and De Francesco, Davide and van Zoest, Rosan A and Leech, Robert and Wit, Ferdinand WNM and Portegies, Peter and Geurtsen, Gert J and Schmand, Ben A and Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F  and Franceschi, Claudio and Sabin, Caroline A and Majoie, Charles BLM and Winston, Alan and Reiss, Peter and Sharp, David J and COBRA Collaboration, on behalf of the and Libert, Claude and Dewaele, Sylviane},
  issn         = {0028-3878},
  journal      = {NEUROLOGY},
  keyword      = {COMBINATION ANTIRETROVIRAL THERAPY,IMMUNODEFICIENCY-VIRUS-INFECTION,AGE,MEN,INDIVIDUALS,COGNITION,COHORT,COMORBIDITIES,ASSOCIATION,PREMATURE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {14},
  pages        = {1349--1357},
  title        = {Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/WNL.0000000000003790},
  volume       = {88},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Cole, James H, Jonathan Underwood, Matthan WA Caan, Davide De Francesco, Rosan A van Zoest, Robert Leech, Ferdinand WNM Wit, et al. 2017. “Increased Brain-predicted Aging in Treated HIV Disease.” Neurology 88 (14): 1349–1357.
APA
Cole, J. H., Underwood, J., Caan, M. W., De Francesco, D., van Zoest, R. A., Leech, R., Wit, F. W., et al. (2017). Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease. NEUROLOGY, 88(14), 1349–1357.
Vancouver
1.
Cole JH, Underwood J, Caan MW, De Francesco D, van Zoest RA, Leech R, et al. Increased brain-predicted aging in treated HIV disease. NEUROLOGY. 2017;88(14):1349–57.
MLA
Cole, James H, Jonathan Underwood, Matthan WA Caan, et al. “Increased Brain-predicted Aging in Treated HIV Disease.” NEUROLOGY 88.14 (2017): 1349–1357. Print.