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Titania-functionalized diatom frustules as photocatalyst for indoor air purification

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Abstract
Diatom frustules were extracted from the species Thalassiosira pseudonana and functionalized with titania to be used as photocatalysts in the abatement of acetaldehyde. The synthetic procedure is water-based and environmentally friendly. The synthesis parameters were optimized to give the highest possible photocatalytic activity. The optimized material, visualized with TEM and STEM-EDX, shows the TiO2 nanoparticles grafted inside the frustule pores, as well as on the silica surface. The titania particles, stabilized by the frustules, are 2.5 times more active than the P25 benchmark material. The photocatalyst is then tested in conditions of elevated relative humidity, to simulate indoor air. The catalytic activity only shows a minor decrease at 50% relative humidity, which is a better result than for the P25 benchmark. When tested over an extended period of time, the photocatalyst only shows a minor decrease in activity.
Keywords
Titania, Diatom frustule, Photocatalysis, Acetaldehyde degradation, X-RAY-SCATTERING, GAS-PHASE, SILICA, TIO2, DIOXIDE, DEGRADATION, BIOSILICA, LEVEL, PHOTODEGRADATION, NANOPARTICLES

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Chicago
Ouwehand, Judith, Erik Van Eynde, Els De Canck, Silvia Lenaerts, An Verberckmoes, and Pascal Van Der Voort. 2018. “Titania-functionalized Diatom Frustules as Photocatalyst for Indoor Air Purification.” Applied Catalysis B-environmental 226: 303–310.
APA
Ouwehand, J., Van Eynde, E., De Canck, E., Lenaerts, S., Verberckmoes, A., & Van Der Voort, P. (2018). Titania-functionalized diatom frustules as photocatalyst for indoor air purification. APPLIED CATALYSIS B-ENVIRONMENTAL, 226, 303–310.
Vancouver
1.
Ouwehand J, Van Eynde E, De Canck E, Lenaerts S, Verberckmoes A, Van Der Voort P. Titania-functionalized diatom frustules as photocatalyst for indoor air purification. APPLIED CATALYSIS B-ENVIRONMENTAL. 2018;226:303–10.
MLA
Ouwehand, Judith, Erik Van Eynde, Els De Canck, et al. “Titania-functionalized Diatom Frustules as Photocatalyst for Indoor Air Purification.” APPLIED CATALYSIS B-ENVIRONMENTAL 226 (2018): 303–310. Print.
@article{8555198,
  abstract     = {Diatom frustules were extracted from the species Thalassiosira pseudonana and functionalized with titania to be used as photocatalysts in the abatement of acetaldehyde. The synthetic procedure is water-based and environmentally friendly. The synthesis parameters were optimized to give the highest possible photocatalytic activity. The optimized material, visualized with TEM and STEM-EDX, shows the TiO2 nanoparticles grafted inside the frustule pores, as well as on the silica surface. The titania particles, stabilized by the frustules, are 2.5 times more active than the P25 benchmark material. The photocatalyst is then tested in conditions of elevated relative humidity, to simulate indoor air. The catalytic activity only shows a minor decrease at 50\% relative humidity, which is a better result than for the P25 benchmark. When tested over an extended period of time, the photocatalyst only shows a minor decrease in activity.},
  author       = {Ouwehand, Judith and Van Eynde, Erik and De Canck, Els and Lenaerts, Silvia and Verberckmoes, An and Van Der Voort, Pascal},
  issn         = {0926-3373},
  journal      = {APPLIED CATALYSIS B-ENVIRONMENTAL},
  keyword      = {Titania,Diatom frustule,Photocatalysis,Acetaldehyde degradation,X-RAY-SCATTERING,GAS-PHASE,SILICA,TIO2,DIOXIDE,DEGRADATION,BIOSILICA,LEVEL,PHOTODEGRADATION,NANOPARTICLES},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {303--310},
  title        = {Titania-functionalized diatom frustules as photocatalyst for indoor air purification},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.apcatb.2017.12.063},
  volume       = {226},
  year         = {2018},
}

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