Advanced search
1 file | 359.86 KB Add to list

A pragmatic bottom-up approach to harmonize the units of clinical chemistry tests among Belgian clinical laboratories, focusing on immunoassays

Author
Organization
Abstract
Background: Harmonization of units is an important step to improve the comparability of clinical chemistry results, but few examples exist of successful harmonization efforts. We present the results of a pragmatic approach that was implemented in Belgium from 2012. Methods: After a large consultation and information of stakeholders, preferred units were proposed for 140 assays, including the 23 immunoassays discussed in more detail here. The change occurred in two phases, first involving assays for which there was no change in the numerical result, then changes involving a change in numerical results. Laboratories were invited to participate in this harmonization on a voluntary basis. The project was based on a bottom-up approach, large consultation and the pragmatic choice of the proposed units, including conventional and SI units. Results: The large heterogeneity of units was drastically reduced; adoption of the preferred units increased from 3% (insulin) - 45% (HCG) to 70% (insulin) - 96% (LH and FSH). Adoption of the preferred units was higher if it involved no change in numerical values (90%) than when there was a change (76%). Conclusions: We believe that the harmonization effort has reached its goals. Without aiming at implementing SI units for all parameters, our strategy was successful with a large majority of the laboratories switching to the proposed units. Moreover, the harmonization program is still progressing, with additional laboratories converting to the consensus units.
Keywords
Belgium, harmonization, immunoassays, reporting units, STANDARDIZATION, QUANTITIES, CONVERSION, MEDICINE

Downloads

  • (...).pdf
    • full text
    • |
    • UGent only
    • |
    • PDF
    • |
    • 359.86 KB

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

MLA
Demarteau, Marianne et al. “A Pragmatic Bottom-up Approach to Harmonize the Units of Clinical Chemistry Tests Among Belgian Clinical Laboratories, Focusing on Immunoassays.” CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE 57.1 (2019): 12–19. Print.
APA
Demarteau, M., Cammaert, P., Vandevelde, N. M., Callewaert, N., Coucke, W., China, B., & Verstraete, A. (2019). A pragmatic bottom-up approach to harmonize the units of clinical chemistry tests among Belgian clinical laboratories, focusing on immunoassays. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE, 57(1), 12–19.
Chicago author-date
Demarteau, Marianne, Piet Cammaert, Nathalie M Vandevelde, Nico Callewaert, Wim Coucke, Bernard China, and Alain Verstraete. 2019. “A Pragmatic Bottom-up Approach to Harmonize the Units of Clinical Chemistry Tests Among Belgian Clinical Laboratories, Focusing on Immunoassays.” Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine 57 (1): 12–19.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Demarteau, Marianne, Piet Cammaert, Nathalie M Vandevelde, Nico Callewaert, Wim Coucke, Bernard China, and Alain Verstraete. 2019. “A Pragmatic Bottom-up Approach to Harmonize the Units of Clinical Chemistry Tests Among Belgian Clinical Laboratories, Focusing on Immunoassays.” Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine 57 (1): 12–19.
Vancouver
1.
Demarteau M, Cammaert P, Vandevelde NM, Callewaert N, Coucke W, China B, et al. A pragmatic bottom-up approach to harmonize the units of clinical chemistry tests among Belgian clinical laboratories, focusing on immunoassays. CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE. 2019;57(1):12–9.
IEEE
[1]
M. Demarteau et al., “A pragmatic bottom-up approach to harmonize the units of clinical chemistry tests among Belgian clinical laboratories, focusing on immunoassays,” CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE, vol. 57, no. 1, pp. 12–19, 2019.
@article{8554710,
  abstract     = {Background: Harmonization of units is an important step to improve the comparability of clinical chemistry results, but few examples exist of successful harmonization efforts. We present the results of a pragmatic approach that was implemented in Belgium from 2012. 
Methods: After a large consultation and information of stakeholders, preferred units were proposed for 140 assays, including the 23 immunoassays discussed in more detail here. The change occurred in two phases, first involving assays for which there was no change in the numerical result, then changes involving a change in numerical results. Laboratories were invited to participate in this harmonization on a voluntary basis. The project was based on a bottom-up approach, large consultation and the pragmatic choice of the proposed units, including conventional and SI units. 
Results: The large heterogeneity of units was drastically reduced; adoption of the preferred units increased from 3% (insulin) - 45% (HCG) to 70% (insulin) - 96% (LH and FSH). Adoption of the preferred units was higher if it involved no change in numerical values (90%) than when there was a change (76%). 
Conclusions: We believe that the harmonization effort has reached its goals. Without aiming at implementing SI units for all parameters, our strategy was successful with a large majority of the laboratories switching to the proposed units. Moreover, the harmonization program is still progressing, with additional laboratories converting to the consensus units.},
  author       = {Demarteau, Marianne and Cammaert, Piet and Vandevelde, Nathalie M and Callewaert, Nico and Coucke, Wim and China, Bernard and Verstraete, Alain},
  issn         = {1434-6621},
  journal      = {CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND LABORATORY MEDICINE},
  keywords     = {Belgium,harmonization,immunoassays,reporting units,STANDARDIZATION,QUANTITIES,CONVERSION,MEDICINE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {1},
  pages        = {12--19},
  title        = {A pragmatic bottom-up approach to harmonize the units of clinical chemistry tests among Belgian clinical laboratories, focusing on immunoassays},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1515/cclm-2017-0824},
  volume       = {57},
  year         = {2019},
}

Altmetric
View in Altmetric
Web of Science
Times cited: