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Pyothorax in cats and dogs

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Abstract
Pyothorax, or thoracic empyema, is an infection of the pleural space, characterized by the accumulation of purulent exudate. It is a life-threatening emergency in dogs as well as in cats, with a guarded prognosis. Dyspnea and/or tachypnea, anorexia and lethargy are the most typical clinical signs. Diagnosis is usually straightforward, based on the clinical symptoms combined with pleural fluid analysis, including cytology and bacterial culture. Most commonly, oropharyngeal flora is isolated in the pleural fluid. Treatment can be medical or surgical, but needs to be immediate and aggressive. In this article, an overview of the various causes of both feline and canine pyothorax with its similarities and differences is provided. Epidemiology, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are discussed.
Keywords
COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FINDINGS, FELINE PYOTHORAX, PLEURAL EFFUSION, SMALL, ANIMALS, MANAGEMENT, CANINE, BACTERIA, DISEASE, ACTINOMYCOSIS, THORACOSCOPY

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Citation

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Chicago
Gorris, Falke, S Faut, Sylvie Daminet, Hilde De Rooster, Jimmy Saunders, and Dominique Paepe. 2017. “Pyothorax in Cats and Dogs.” Vlaams Diergeneeskundig Tijdschrift 86 (3): 183–197.
APA
Gorris, Falke, Faut, S., Daminet, S., De Rooster, H., Saunders, J., & Paepe, D. (2017). Pyothorax in cats and dogs. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT, 86(3), 183–197.
Vancouver
1.
Gorris F, Faut S, Daminet S, De Rooster H, Saunders J, Paepe D. Pyothorax in cats and dogs. VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT. 2017;86(3):183–97.
MLA
Gorris, Falke, S Faut, Sylvie Daminet, et al. “Pyothorax in Cats and Dogs.” VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT 86.3 (2017): 183–197. Print.
@article{8554653,
  abstract     = {Pyothorax, or thoracic empyema, is an infection of the pleural space, characterized by the accumulation of purulent exudate. It is a life-threatening emergency in dogs as well as in cats, with a guarded prognosis. Dyspnea and/or tachypnea, anorexia and lethargy are the most typical clinical signs. Diagnosis is usually straightforward, based on the clinical symptoms combined with pleural fluid analysis, including cytology and bacterial culture. Most commonly, oropharyngeal flora is isolated in the pleural fluid. Treatment can be medical or surgical, but needs to be immediate and aggressive. In this article, an overview of the various causes of both feline and canine pyothorax with its similarities and differences is provided. Epidemiology, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment and prognosis are discussed.},
  author       = {Gorris, Falke and Faut, S and Daminet, Sylvie and De Rooster, Hilde and Saunders, Jimmy and Paepe, Dominique},
  issn         = {0303-9021},
  journal      = {VLAAMS DIERGENEESKUNDIG TIJDSCHRIFT},
  keyword      = {COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC FINDINGS,FELINE PYOTHORAX,PLEURAL EFFUSION,SMALL,ANIMALS,MANAGEMENT,CANINE,BACTERIA,DISEASE,ACTINOMYCOSIS,THORACOSCOPY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {183--197},
  title        = {Pyothorax in cats and dogs},
  volume       = {86},
  year         = {2017},
}

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