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Biased interpretations of ambiguous bodily threat information in adolescents with chronic pain

L. C. Heathcote, K. Jacobs, Christopher Eccleston UGent, E. Fox and J. Y. F. Lau (2017) PAIN. 158(3). p.471-478
abstract
Adult patients with chronic pain are consistently shown to interpret ambiguous health and bodily information in a pain- related and threatening way. This interpretation bias may play a role in the development and maintenance of pain and disability. However, no studies have yet investigated the role of interpretation bias in adolescent patients with pain, despite that pain often first becomes chronic in youth. We administered the Adolescent Interpretations of Bodily Threat (AIBT) task to adolescents with chronic pain (N = 66) and adolescents without chronic pain (N = 74). Adolescents were 10 to 18 years old and completed the study procedures either at the clinic (patient group) or at school (control group). We found that adolescents with chronic pain were less likely to endorse benign interpretations of ambiguous pain and bodily threat information than adolescents without chronic pain, particularly when reporting on the strength of belief in those interpretations being true. These differences between patients and controls were not evident for ambiguous social situations, and they could not be explained by differences in anxious or depressive symptoms. Furthermore, this interpretation pattern was associated with increased levels of disability among adolescent patients, even after controlling for severity of chronic pain and pain catastrophizing. The current findings extend our understanding of the role and nature of cognition in adolescent pain, and provide justification for using the AIBT task in longitudinal and training studies to further investigate causal associations between interpretation bias and chronic pain.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
keyword
REVISED CHILD ANXIETY, NEGATIVE INTERPRETATION BIAS, CHRONIC, MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN, RECURRENT ABDOMINAL-PAIN, ATTENTIONAL BIAS, DEPRESSION SCALE, SOCIAL REORIENTATION, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, ANXIOUS, CHILDREN, EXPERIENCE, Interpretation bias, Adolescents, Chronic pain, Cognitive bias, Ambiguous situations
journal title
PAIN
Pain
volume
158
issue
3
pages
8 pages
publisher
Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
place of publication
Philadelphia
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000398114100014
ISSN
0304-3959
1872-6623
DOI
10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000781
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
id
8554204
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8554204
date created
2018-03-08 16:34:48
date last changed
2018-03-26 07:43:15
@article{8554204,
  abstract     = {Adult patients with chronic pain are consistently shown to interpret ambiguous health and bodily information in a pain- related and threatening way. This interpretation bias may play a role in the development and maintenance of pain and disability. However, no studies have yet investigated the role of interpretation bias in adolescent patients with pain, despite that pain often first becomes chronic in youth. We administered the Adolescent Interpretations of Bodily Threat (AIBT) task to adolescents with chronic pain (N = 66) and adolescents without chronic pain (N = 74). Adolescents were 10 to 18 years old and completed the study procedures either at the clinic (patient group) or at school (control group). We found that adolescents with chronic pain were less likely to endorse benign interpretations of ambiguous pain and bodily threat information than adolescents without chronic pain, particularly when reporting on the strength of belief in those interpretations being true. These differences between patients and controls were not evident for ambiguous social situations, and they could not be explained by differences in anxious or depressive symptoms. Furthermore, this interpretation pattern was associated with increased levels of disability among adolescent patients, even after controlling for severity of chronic pain and pain catastrophizing. The current findings extend our understanding of the role and nature of cognition in adolescent pain, and provide justification for using the AIBT task in longitudinal and training studies to further investigate causal associations between interpretation bias and chronic pain.},
  author       = {Heathcote, L. C. and Jacobs, K. and Eccleston, Christopher and Fox, E. and Lau, J. Y. F.},
  issn         = {0304-3959},
  journal      = {PAIN},
  keyword      = {REVISED CHILD ANXIETY,NEGATIVE INTERPRETATION BIAS,CHRONIC,MUSCULOSKELETAL PAIN,RECURRENT ABDOMINAL-PAIN,ATTENTIONAL BIAS,DEPRESSION SCALE,SOCIAL REORIENTATION,SELECTIVE ATTENTION,ANXIOUS,CHILDREN,EXPERIENCE,Interpretation bias,Adolescents,Chronic pain,Cognitive bias,Ambiguous situations},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {471--478},
  publisher    = {Lippincott Williams \& Wilkins},
  title        = {Biased interpretations of ambiguous bodily threat information in adolescents with chronic pain},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/j.pain.0000000000000781},
  volume       = {158},
  year         = {2017},
}

Chicago
Heathcote, L. C., K. Jacobs, Christopher Eccleston, E. Fox, and J. Y. F. Lau. 2017. “Biased Interpretations of Ambiguous Bodily Threat Information in Adolescents with Chronic Pain.” Pain 158 (3): 471–478.
APA
Heathcote, L. C., Jacobs, K., Eccleston, C., Fox, E., & Lau, J. Y. F. (2017). Biased interpretations of ambiguous bodily threat information in adolescents with chronic pain. PAIN, 158(3), 471–478.
Vancouver
1.
Heathcote LC, Jacobs K, Eccleston C, Fox E, Lau JYF. Biased interpretations of ambiguous bodily threat information in adolescents with chronic pain. PAIN. Philadelphia: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2017;158(3):471–8.
MLA
Heathcote, L. C., K. Jacobs, Christopher Eccleston, et al. “Biased Interpretations of Ambiguous Bodily Threat Information in Adolescents with Chronic Pain.” PAIN 158.3 (2017): 471–478. Print.