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Effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on cancer outcome in patients undergoing sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer

Dirk Van de Putte (UGent) , Elke Van Daele (UGent) , Wouter Willaert (UGent) , Piet Pattyn (UGent) , Wim Ceelen (UGent) and Yves Van Nieuwenhove (UGent)
(2017) JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY. 116(6). p.722-729
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Abstract
Background: In rectal cancer, the significance of abdominopelvic sepsis (APS) on metastatic tumor growth remains uncertain. We aimed to analyze the effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on long-term survival in patients undergoing restorative rectal cancer surgery. Methods: Data were used from the Belgian PROCARE rectal cancer registry. The effect of abdominopelvic infection on survival was assessed in uni- and multivariable Cox regression models. The effect of clinical and pathological covariates was controlled by propensity score-based matching of cases with controls. The effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on the rate of local and metastatic recurrence was evaluated using cross-tabulation and the Pearson chi(2) test. Results: In univariable analysis, the presence of APS was associated with significantly worse overall survival (HR 1.3, P = 0.025). After propensity score matching including age, BMI, tumor level, pTstage, pN stage, CRM, tumor grade, number of lymph nodes, and presence of lymphovascular invasion, the association of APS with OS was no longer significant (HR 1.26, 95%CI 0.92-1.74, P = 0.15). No differences were observed in the risk of local or metastatic recurrence (3.6% vs 2.9% and 13% vs 16.5%). Conclusions: In this analysis APS after rectal cancer resection was not significantly associated with OS, metastatic, or local recurrence.
Keywords
abdominopelvic sepsis, metastatic recurrence, prognosis, rectal cancer, TOTAL MESORECTAL EXCISION, POTENTIALLY CURATIVE RESECTION, LOW ANTERIOR RESECTION, ANASTOMOTIC LEAKAGE, COLORECTAL-CANCER, LOCAL RECURRENCE, RISK-FACTOR, IMPROVEMENT PROJECT, INFLAMMATION, SURVIVAL

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Chicago
Van de Putte, Dirk, Elke Van Daele, Wouter Willaert, Piet Pattyn, Wim Ceelen, and Yves Van Nieuwenhove. 2017. “Effect of Abdominopelvic Sepsis on Cancer Outcome in Patients Undergoing Sphincter Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer.” Journal of Surgical Oncology 116 (6): 722–729.
APA
Van de Putte, D., Van Daele, E., Willaert, W., Pattyn, P., Ceelen, W., & Van Nieuwenhove, Y. (2017). Effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on cancer outcome in patients undergoing sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer. JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY, 116(6), 722–729.
Vancouver
1.
Van de Putte D, Van Daele E, Willaert W, Pattyn P, Ceelen W, Van Nieuwenhove Y. Effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on cancer outcome in patients undergoing sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer. JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY. 2017;116(6):722–9.
MLA
Van de Putte, Dirk, Elke Van Daele, Wouter Willaert, et al. “Effect of Abdominopelvic Sepsis on Cancer Outcome in Patients Undergoing Sphincter Saving Surgery for Rectal Cancer.” JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY 116.6 (2017): 722–729. Print.
@article{8550494,
  abstract     = {Background: In rectal cancer, the significance of abdominopelvic sepsis (APS) on metastatic tumor growth remains uncertain. We aimed to analyze the effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on long-term survival in patients undergoing restorative rectal cancer surgery. 
Methods: Data were used from the Belgian PROCARE rectal cancer registry. The effect of abdominopelvic infection on survival was assessed in uni- and multivariable Cox regression models. The effect of clinical and pathological covariates was controlled by propensity score-based matching of cases with controls. The effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on the rate of local and metastatic recurrence was evaluated using cross-tabulation and the Pearson chi(2) test. 
Results: In univariable analysis, the presence of APS was associated with significantly worse overall survival (HR 1.3, P = 0.025). After propensity score matching including age, BMI, tumor level, pTstage, pN stage, CRM, tumor grade, number of lymph nodes, and presence of lymphovascular invasion, the association of APS with OS was no longer significant (HR 1.26, 95\%CI 0.92-1.74, P = 0.15). No differences were observed in the risk of local or metastatic recurrence (3.6\% vs 2.9\% and 13\% vs 16.5\%). 
Conclusions: In this analysis APS after rectal cancer resection was not significantly associated with OS, metastatic, or local recurrence.},
  author       = {Van de Putte, Dirk and Van Daele, Elke and Willaert, Wouter and Pattyn, Piet and Ceelen, Wim and Van Nieuwenhove, Yves},
  issn         = {0022-4790},
  journal      = {JOURNAL OF SURGICAL ONCOLOGY},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {6},
  pages        = {722--729},
  title        = {Effect of abdominopelvic sepsis on cancer outcome in patients undergoing sphincter saving surgery for rectal cancer},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/jso.24706},
  volume       = {116},
  year         = {2017},
}

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