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‘Barthes on Racine: The Deathbed of the Author?’

Reuben Martens (UGent)
(2015)
Author
Organization
Abstract
The Author died in Paris in 1967 by the hand of Roland Barthes, in his (in)famous essay “The Death of the Author”. The outcry following this tragic decease was immense; critics were mourning and cursing Barthes to damnation for his audacity to kill such an important figure. Many would argue that this had everything to do with the spirit of the time: les événements, intellectual revolts and student protests in France in May 1968, given that the essay was only then first published in France. Yet, this is a misconception: Barthes published ‘The Death of the Author’ one year earlier in Aspen, an American magazine. More so, it may be argued that this death certificate of The Author was merely an epitome, something that was about to be foreseen and based on ideas that sprouted earlier in Barthes’ career. As I want to argue, the roots of the death of the author can be traced back to On Racine, published as early as 1963, perhaps his metaphorical deathbed. Later publications in between 1963 and 1967 should thus show the slow moribundity of the Author. In this paper, I want to explore the progression of the death of the Author, beginning with On Racine and ending with ‘The Death of the Author’; the genesis of the idea should be traceable throughout Barthes’ earlier publications.

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Martens, Reuben. 2015. “‘Barthes on Racine: The Deathbed of the Author?’” In .
APA
Martens, Reuben. (2015). “Barthes on Racine: The Deathbed of the Author?” Presented at the Roland Barthes at 100.
Vancouver
1.
Martens R. “Barthes on Racine: The Deathbed of the Author?”2015.
MLA
Martens, Reuben. “‘Barthes on Racine: The Deathbed of the Author?’” 2015. Print.
@inproceedings{8549965,
  abstract     = {The Author died in Paris in 1967 by the hand of Roland Barthes, in his (in)famous essay {\textquotedblleft}The Death of the Author{\textquotedblright}. The outcry following this tragic decease was immense; critics were mourning and cursing Barthes to damnation for his audacity to kill such an important figure. Many would argue that this had everything to do with the spirit of the time: les {\'e}v{\'e}nements, intellectual revolts and student protests in France in May 1968, given that the essay was only then first published in France. Yet, this is a misconception: Barthes published {\textquoteleft}The Death of the Author{\textquoteright} one year earlier in Aspen, an American magazine. More so, it may be argued that this death certificate of The Author was merely an epitome, something that was about to be foreseen and based on ideas that sprouted earlier in Barthes{\textquoteright} career. As I want to argue, the roots of the death of the author can be traced back to On Racine, published as early as 1963, perhaps his metaphorical deathbed. Later publications in between 1963 and 1967 should thus show the slow moribundity of the Author. In this paper, I want to explore the progression of the death of the Author, beginning with On Racine and ending with {\textquoteleft}The Death of the Author{\textquoteright}; the genesis of the idea should be traceable throughout Barthes{\textquoteright} earlier publications.},
  author       = {Martens, Reuben},
  language     = {eng},
  location     = {Cardiff, Wales},
  title        = {{\textquoteleft}Barthes on Racine: The Deathbed of the Author?{\textquoteright}},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.13140/RG.2.1.3925.9045},
  year         = {2015},
}

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