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Hobbits, ents, and dæmons : ecocritical thought embodied in the fantastic

Gry Ulstein (UGent)
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Abstract
This paper investigates the occurrence of ecocritical thought in two canonical fantasy epics, The Lord of The Rings (1954–1955) by J. R. R. Tolkien and His Dark Materials (1995–2000) by Philip Pullman. Using current ecocritical theory as well as writers and critics of speculative fiction to study the primary works from a marginalized angle, this paper argues that fantasy fiction, more than other literary genres, has an intrinsic exploratory potential for ecocritical ideas because the strong immersive aspect of the genre entices the reader to open up for a less anthropocentric view of the world. If this is investigated further, the narrow space for fantasy literature in literary criticism and academia may be broadened to include a more politically engaged discussion of fantasy than typically assumed.
Keywords
ecocriticism, ecocentrism, anthropocentrism, fantastic literature

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Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Ulstein, Gry. 2015. “Hobbits, Ents, and Dæmons : Ecocritical Thought Embodied in the Fantastic.” Fafnir : Nordic Journal of Science Fiction and Fantasy Research 2 (4): 7–17.
APA
Ulstein, G. (2015). Hobbits, ents, and dæmons : ecocritical thought embodied in the fantastic. FAFNIR : NORDIC JOURNAL OF SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY RESEARCH, 2(4), 7–17.
Vancouver
1.
Ulstein G. Hobbits, ents, and dæmons : ecocritical thought embodied in the fantastic. FAFNIR : NORDIC JOURNAL OF SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY RESEARCH. 2015;2(4):7–17.
MLA
Ulstein, Gry. “Hobbits, Ents, and Dæmons : Ecocritical Thought Embodied in the Fantastic.” FAFNIR : NORDIC JOURNAL OF SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY RESEARCH 2.4 (2015): 7–17. Print.
@article{8549632,
  abstract     = {This paper investigates the occurrence of ecocritical thought in two canonical fantasy epics, The Lord of The Rings (1954--1955) by J. R. R. Tolkien and His Dark Materials (1995--2000) by Philip Pullman. Using current ecocritical theory as well as writers and critics of speculative fiction to study the primary works from a marginalized angle, this paper argues that fantasy fiction, more than other literary genres, has an intrinsic exploratory potential for ecocritical ideas because the strong immersive aspect of the genre entices the reader to open up for a less anthropocentric view of the world. If this is investigated further, the narrow space for fantasy literature in literary criticism and academia may be broadened to include a more politically engaged discussion of fantasy than typically assumed.},
  author       = {Ulstein, Gry},
  issn         = {2342-2009},
  journal      = {FAFNIR : NORDIC JOURNAL OF SCIENCE FICTION AND FANTASY RESEARCH},
  keyword      = {ecocriticism,ecocentrism,anthropocentrism,fantastic literature},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {4},
  pages        = {7--17},
  title        = {Hobbits, ents, and d{\ae}mons : ecocritical thought embodied in the fantastic},
  url          = {http://journal.finfar.org/fafnir-42015/},
  volume       = {2},
  year         = {2015},
}