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Analgesia (mis)usage on a dental emergency service : a patient survey

Geert Hommez UGent, Britt Ongena, Rita Cauwels UGent, Peter De Paepe UGent, Véronique Christiaens UGent and Wolfgang Jacquet UGent (2018) CLINICAL ORAL INVESTIGATIONS. 22(3). p.1297-1302
abstract
Analgesics are one of the most frequently used medicines. Self-medication and misuse have been described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to document analgesic (mis)use in a population seeking emergency dental treatment. Patients consulting a dental emergency service were randomly asked to complete a questionnaire on analgesic use, knowledge and information on the analgesics and on their pain history. A photobook was used as an aid to identify products used. Descriptive statistics were combined with chi-square and Mann-Whitney U testing. Ninety-eight patients were included. Acetaminophen (69.4%) and ibuprofen (65.3%) were the most frequently used products. Nearly half of the subjects (43.9%) combined at least two analgesics. Although 42.9% of subjects were aware of the maximum daily dose, 62.2% of the subjects exceeded this limit, specifically 76.6% of subjects using ibuprofen and 32.4% of subjects using acetaminophen overdosing. Females overdosed significantly more than males. Ingestion on medical advice did not affect the overdose rates significantly. No significant relation was found between the absence of knowledge on the maximum daily dose and actual overdosing. No higher pain reduction was found in patients overdosing analgesics. The average number of days patients experienced pain before consulting the emergency unit was 12. A significant relation was found between the lag time and overdosing. A large portion of the patients overdosed analgesics. Even prior medical advice did not reduce significantly overdose rates. Dentists treating emergency cases clearly need to be aware of the high risk and high rates of overdosing analgesics in their patients.
Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:
author
organization
year
type
journalArticle (original)
publication status
published
subject
keyword
Dental, Emergency, Analgesics, Overdose, Misuse, Pain, THE-COUNTER ANALGESICS, PARACETAMOL OVERDOSE, PAIN MANAGEMENT, ACETAMINOPHEN, SECONDARY, RISK
journal title
CLINICAL ORAL INVESTIGATIONS
Clin. Oral Investig.
volume
22
issue
3
pages
1297 - 1302
Web of Science type
Article
Web of Science id
000428326400020
ISSN
1432-6981
1436-3771
DOI
10.1007/s00784-017-2228-6
language
English
UGent publication?
yes
classification
A1
copyright statement
I have transferred the copyright for this publication to the publisher
id
8549441
handle
http://hdl.handle.net/1854/LU-8549441
date created
2018-02-12 08:42:40
date last changed
2018-06-14 10:49:47
@article{8549441,
  abstract     = {Analgesics are one of the most frequently used medicines. Self-medication and misuse have been described in the literature. The purpose of this study was to document analgesic (mis)use in a population seeking emergency dental treatment. 
Patients consulting a dental emergency service were randomly asked to complete a questionnaire on analgesic use, knowledge and information on the analgesics and on their pain history. A photobook was used as an aid to identify products used. Descriptive statistics were combined with chi-square and Mann-Whitney U testing. 
Ninety-eight patients were included. Acetaminophen (69.4\%) and ibuprofen (65.3\%) were the most frequently used products. Nearly half of the subjects (43.9\%) combined at least two analgesics. Although 42.9\% of subjects were aware of the maximum daily dose, 62.2\% of the subjects exceeded this limit, specifically 76.6\% of subjects using ibuprofen and 32.4\% of subjects using acetaminophen overdosing. Females overdosed significantly more than males. Ingestion on medical advice did not affect the overdose rates significantly. No significant relation was found between the absence of knowledge on the maximum daily dose and actual overdosing. No higher pain reduction was found in patients overdosing analgesics. The average number of days patients experienced pain before consulting the emergency unit was 12. A significant relation was found between the lag time and overdosing. 
A large portion of the patients overdosed analgesics. Even prior medical advice did not reduce significantly overdose rates. 
Dentists treating emergency cases clearly need to be aware of the high risk and high rates of overdosing analgesics in their patients.},
  author       = {Hommez, Geert and Ongena, Britt and Cauwels, Rita and De Paepe, Peter and Christiaens, V{\'e}ronique and Jacquet, Wolfgang},
  issn         = {1432-6981},
  journal      = {CLINICAL ORAL INVESTIGATIONS},
  keyword      = {Dental,Emergency,Analgesics,Overdose,Misuse,Pain,THE-COUNTER ANALGESICS,PARACETAMOL OVERDOSE,PAIN MANAGEMENT,ACETAMINOPHEN,SECONDARY,RISK},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {3},
  pages        = {1297--1302},
  title        = {Analgesia (mis)usage on a dental emergency service : a patient survey},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00784-017-2228-6},
  volume       = {22},
  year         = {2018},
}

Chicago
Hommez, Geert, Britt Ongena, Rita Cauwels, Peter De Paepe, Véronique Christiaens, and Wolfgang Jacquet. 2018. “Analgesia (mis)usage on a Dental Emergency Service : a Patient Survey.” Clinical Oral Investigations 22 (3): 1297–1302.
APA
Hommez, G., Ongena, B., Cauwels, R., De Paepe, P., Christiaens, V., & Jacquet, W. (2018). Analgesia (mis)usage on a dental emergency service : a patient survey. CLINICAL ORAL INVESTIGATIONS, 22(3), 1297–1302.
Vancouver
1.
Hommez G, Ongena B, Cauwels R, De Paepe P, Christiaens V, Jacquet W. Analgesia (mis)usage on a dental emergency service : a patient survey. CLINICAL ORAL INVESTIGATIONS. 2018;22(3):1297–302.
MLA
Hommez, Geert, Britt Ongena, Rita Cauwels, et al. “Analgesia (mis)usage on a Dental Emergency Service : a Patient Survey.” CLINICAL ORAL INVESTIGATIONS 22.3 (2018): 1297–1302. Print.