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Human mimicry in personnel selection: Does being a chameleon influence employment interview outcomes?

Elias Corneillie (UGent) , Frederik Anseel (UGent) and Filip Lievens (UGent)
(2017)
Author
Organization
Abstract
Purpose This study shifts the scientific attention from traditional nonverbal impression management research to an interactional perspective on employment interviews by studying the effects of human mimicry, the relative importance of its different forms and to job-related competences. Computer vision technology is integrated to unfold the currently unknown temporal (i.e. time delay and duration) and interactional aspects of mimicry. Design Master psychology students (N = 251) engaged in mock employment interviews in which they were rated on four competences and four affective constructs by trained interviewers. Applicants were randomly assigned to three conditions: mimicking the interviewer, suppressing spontaneous mimicry, and a control condition. Nonverbal behaviours of applicants and interviewers were automatically analysed by computer vision algorithms to analyse interactional and temporal aspects of mimicry. Results Initial analyses indicated that there are differences between conditions in the interviewers’ ratings of affective constructs, but no such effect was found for ratings of competences. We are currently further analysing the data to elaborate the onset and reciprocal nature of mimicking behaviours, to which extent different behaviours are being mimicked, and how different forms of mimicry have different effects on interviewers’ ratings. Research implications The study provides insight on which nonverbal behaviours are mimicked in a highly natural setting and how mimicry influences the interviewers’ ratings of an applicant. Value This research expands previous findings by using a unique experimental manipulation, the recently proposed self-other overlap model, and new computer vision algorithms to progress scientific knowledge about temporal and interactional aspects of mimicry.

Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Corneillie, Elias, Frederik Anseel, and Filip Lievens. 2017. “Human Mimicry in Personnel Selection: Does Being a Chameleon Influence Employment Interview Outcomes?” In .
APA
Corneillie, E., Anseel, F., & Lievens, F. (2017). Human mimicry in personnel selection: Does being a chameleon influence employment interview outcomes? Presented at the 18th congress of the European Association of Work and Organizational Psychology.
Vancouver
1.
Corneillie E, Anseel F, Lievens F. Human mimicry in personnel selection: Does being a chameleon influence employment interview outcomes? 2017.
MLA
Corneillie, Elias, Frederik Anseel, and Filip Lievens. “Human Mimicry in Personnel Selection: Does Being a Chameleon Influence Employment Interview Outcomes?” 2017. Print.
@inproceedings{8548774,
  abstract     = {Purpose 
This study shifts the scientific attention from traditional nonverbal impression management research to an interactional perspective on employment interviews by studying the effects of human mimicry, the relative importance of its different forms and to job-related competences. Computer vision technology is integrated to unfold the currently unknown temporal (i.e. time delay and duration) and interactional aspects of mimicry. 
Design
Master psychology students (N = 251) engaged in mock employment interviews in which they were rated on four competences and four affective constructs by trained interviewers. Applicants were randomly assigned to three conditions: mimicking the interviewer, suppressing spontaneous mimicry, and a control condition. Nonverbal behaviours of applicants and interviewers were automatically analysed by computer vision algorithms to analyse interactional and temporal aspects of mimicry.
Results
Initial analyses indicated that there are differences between conditions in the interviewers{\textquoteright} ratings of affective constructs, but no such effect was found for ratings of competences.  We are currently further analysing the data to elaborate the onset and reciprocal nature of mimicking behaviours, to which extent different behaviours are being mimicked, and how different forms of mimicry have different effects on interviewers{\textquoteright} ratings. 
Research implications
The study provides insight on which nonverbal behaviours are mimicked in a highly natural setting and how mimicry influences the interviewers{\textquoteright} ratings of an applicant.
Value
This research expands previous findings by using a unique experimental manipulation, the recently proposed self-other overlap model, and new computer vision algorithms to progress scientific knowledge about temporal and interactional aspects of mimicry.
},
  author       = {Corneillie, Elias and Anseel, Frederik and Lievens, Filip},
  location     = {Dublin},
  title        = {Human mimicry in personnel selection: Does being a chameleon influence employment interview outcomes?},
  year         = {2017},
}