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Clinical vagus nerve stimulation paradigms induce pronounced brain and body hypothermia in rats

Lars Larsen (UGent) , Wouter Van Lysebettens (UGent) , Charlotte Germonpré (UGent) , Sofie Carrette (UGent) , Sofie Daelemans (UGent) , Mathieu Sprengers (UGent) , Lisa Thyrion (UGent) , Wytse Jan Wadman, Evelien Carrette (UGent) , Jean Delbeke (UGent) , et al.
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Abstract
Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a widely used neuromodulation technique that is currently used or being investigated as therapy for a wide array of human diseases such as epilepsy, depression, Alzheimer's disease, tinnitus, inflammatory diseases, pain, heart failure and many others. Here, we report a pronounced decrease in brain and core temperature during VNS in freely moving rats. Two hours of rapid cycle VNS (7s on/18s off) decreased brain temperature by around 3 degrees C, while standard cycle VNS (30 s on/300 s off) was associated with a decrease of around 1 degrees C. Rectal temperature similarly decreased by more than 3 degrees C during rapid cycle VNS. The hypothermic effect triggered by VNS was further associated with a vasodilation response in the tail, which reflects an active heat release mechanism. Despite previous evidence indicating an important role of the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system in therapeutic effects of VNS, lesioning this system with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 did not attenuate the hypothermic effect. Since body and brain temperature affect most physiological processes, this finding is of substantial importance for interpretation of several previously published VNS studies and for the future direction of research in the field.
Keywords
Vagus nerve stimulation, temperature, rat, EEG, electrophysiology, FREELY MOVING RATS, VAGAL-STIMULATION, STATUS EPILEPTICUS, LOCUS-COERULEUS, PREOPTIC AREA, TEMPERATURE, HIPPOCAMPAL, ANTICONVULSANT, EPILEPSY, SEIZURES

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MLA
Larsen, Lars et al. “Clinical Vagus Nerve Stimulation Paradigms Induce Pronounced Brain and Body Hypothermia in Rats.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEURAL SYSTEMS 27.5 (2017): n. pag. Print.
APA
Larsen, L., Van Lysebettens, W., Germonpré, C., Carrette, S., Daelemans, S., Sprengers, M., Thyrion, L., et al. (2017). Clinical vagus nerve stimulation paradigms induce pronounced brain and body hypothermia in rats. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEURAL SYSTEMS, 27(5).
Chicago author-date
Larsen, Lars, Wouter Van Lysebettens, Charlotte Germonpré, Sofie Carrette, Sofie Daelemans, Mathieu Sprengers, Lisa Thyrion, et al. 2017. “Clinical Vagus Nerve Stimulation Paradigms Induce Pronounced Brain and Body Hypothermia in Rats.” International Journal of Neural Systems 27 (5).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Larsen, Lars, Wouter Van Lysebettens, Charlotte Germonpré, Sofie Carrette, Sofie Daelemans, Mathieu Sprengers, Lisa Thyrion, Wytse Jan Wadman, Evelien Carrette, Jean Delbeke, Paul Boon, Kristl Vonck, and Robrecht Raedt. 2017. “Clinical Vagus Nerve Stimulation Paradigms Induce Pronounced Brain and Body Hypothermia in Rats.” International Journal of Neural Systems 27 (5).
Vancouver
1.
Larsen L, Van Lysebettens W, Germonpré C, Carrette S, Daelemans S, Sprengers M, et al. Clinical vagus nerve stimulation paradigms induce pronounced brain and body hypothermia in rats. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEURAL SYSTEMS. 2017;27(5).
IEEE
[1]
L. Larsen et al., “Clinical vagus nerve stimulation paradigms induce pronounced brain and body hypothermia in rats,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEURAL SYSTEMS, vol. 27, no. 5, 2017.
@article{8547305,
  abstract     = {Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) is a widely used neuromodulation technique that is currently used or being investigated as therapy for a wide array of human diseases such as epilepsy, depression, Alzheimer's disease, tinnitus, inflammatory diseases, pain, heart failure and many others. Here, we report a pronounced decrease in brain and core temperature during VNS in freely moving rats. Two hours of rapid cycle VNS (7s on/18s off) decreased brain temperature by around 3 degrees C, while standard cycle VNS (30 s on/300 s off) was associated with a decrease of around 1 degrees C. Rectal temperature similarly decreased by more than 3 degrees C during rapid cycle VNS. The hypothermic effect triggered by VNS was further associated with a vasodilation response in the tail, which reflects an active heat release mechanism. Despite previous evidence indicating an important role of the locus coeruleus-noradrenergic system in therapeutic effects of VNS, lesioning this system with the noradrenergic neurotoxin DSP-4 did not attenuate the hypothermic effect. Since body and brain temperature affect most physiological processes, this finding is of substantial importance for interpretation of several previously published VNS studies and for the future direction of research in the field.},
  articleno    = {1750016},
  author       = {Larsen, Lars and Van Lysebettens, Wouter and Germonpré, Charlotte and Carrette, Sofie and Daelemans, Sofie and Sprengers, Mathieu and Thyrion, Lisa and Wadman, Wytse Jan and Carrette, Evelien and Delbeke, Jean and Boon, Paul and Vonck, Kristl and Raedt, Robrecht},
  issn         = {0129-0657},
  journal      = {INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF NEURAL SYSTEMS},
  keywords     = {Vagus nerve stimulation,temperature,rat,EEG,electrophysiology,FREELY MOVING RATS,VAGAL-STIMULATION,STATUS EPILEPTICUS,LOCUS-COERULEUS,PREOPTIC AREA,TEMPERATURE,HIPPOCAMPAL,ANTICONVULSANT,EPILEPSY,SEIZURES},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {5},
  pages        = {13},
  title        = {Clinical vagus nerve stimulation paradigms induce pronounced brain and body hypothermia in rats},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1142/S0129065717500162},
  volume       = {27},
  year         = {2017},
}

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