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Differing growth responses to nutritional supplements in neighboring health districts of Burkina Faso are likely due to benefits of small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS)

(2017) PLOS ONE. 12(8).
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Abstract
Background : Of two community-based trials among young children in neighboring health districts of Burkina Faso, one found that small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) increased child growth compared with a non-intervention control group, but zinc supplementation did not in the second study. Objectives : We explored whether the disparate growth outcomes were associated with differences in intervention components, household demographic variables, and/or children's morbidity. Methods : Children in the LNS study received 20g LNS daily containing different amounts of zinc (LNS). Children in the zinc supplementation study received different zinc supplementation regimens (Z-Suppl). Children in both studies were visited weekly for morbidity surveillance. Free malaria and diarrhea treatment was provided by the field worker in the LNS study, and by a village-based community-health worker in the zinc study. Anthropometric assessments were repeated every 13-16 weeks. For the present analyses, study intervals of the two studies were matched by child age and month of enrollment. The changes in length-for-age z-score (LAZ) per interval were compared between LNS and Z-Suppl groups using mixed model ANOVA or ANCOVA. Covariates were added to the model in blocks, and adjusted differences between group means were estimated. Results : Mean ages at enrollment of LNS (n = 1716) and Z-Suppl (n = 1720) were 9.4 +/- 0.4 and 10.1 +/- 2.7 months, respectively. The age-adjusted change in mean LAZ per interval declined less with LNS (-0.07 +/- 0.44) versus Z-Suppl (-0.21 +/- 0.43; p<0.0001). There was a significant group by interval interaction with the greatest difference found in 9-12 month old children (p<0.0001). Adjusting for demographic characteristics and morbidity did not reduce the observed differences by type of intervention, even though the morbidity burden was greater in the LNS group. Conclusions : Greater average physical growth in children who received LNS could not be explained by known cross-trial differences in baseline characteristics or morbidity burden, implying that the observed difference in growth response was partly due to LNS.
Keywords
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL, PREPUBERTAL CHILDREN, EARLY-CHILDHOOD, MALARIA, DIARRHEA, AGE, UNDERNUTRITION, INFANTS, WEIGHT, LENGTH

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MLA
Hess, Sonja Y, Janet M Peerson, Elodie Becquey, et al. “Differing Growth Responses to Nutritional Supplements in Neighboring Health Districts of Burkina Faso Are Likely Due to Benefits of Small-quantity Lipid-based Nutrient Supplements (LNS).” PLOS ONE 12.8 (2017): n. pag. Print.
APA
Hess, S. Y., Peerson, J. M., Becquey, E., Abbeddou, S., Ouédraogo, C. T., Somé, J. W., Yakes Jimenez, E., et al. (2017). Differing growth responses to nutritional supplements in neighboring health districts of Burkina Faso are likely due to benefits of small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS). PLOS ONE, 12(8).
Chicago author-date
Hess, Sonja Y, Janet M Peerson, Elodie Becquey, Souheila Abbeddou, Césaire T Ouédraogo, Jérôme W Somé, Elizabeth Yakes Jimenez, et al. 2017. “Differing Growth Responses to Nutritional Supplements in Neighboring Health Districts of Burkina Faso Are Likely Due to Benefits of Small-quantity Lipid-based Nutrient Supplements (LNS).” Plos One 12 (8).
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Hess, Sonja Y, Janet M Peerson, Elodie Becquey, Souheila Abbeddou, Césaire T Ouédraogo, Jérôme W Somé, Elizabeth Yakes Jimenez, Jean-Bosco Ouédraogo, Stephen A Vosti, Noël Rouamba, and Kenneth H Brown. 2017. “Differing Growth Responses to Nutritional Supplements in Neighboring Health Districts of Burkina Faso Are Likely Due to Benefits of Small-quantity Lipid-based Nutrient Supplements (LNS).” Plos One 12 (8).
Vancouver
1.
Hess SY, Peerson JM, Becquey E, Abbeddou S, Ouédraogo CT, Somé JW, et al. Differing growth responses to nutritional supplements in neighboring health districts of Burkina Faso are likely due to benefits of small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS). PLOS ONE. 2017;12(8).
IEEE
[1]
S. Y. Hess et al., “Differing growth responses to nutritional supplements in neighboring health districts of Burkina Faso are likely due to benefits of small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS),” PLOS ONE, vol. 12, no. 8, 2017.
@article{8547134,
  abstract     = {Background : Of two community-based trials among young children in neighboring health districts of Burkina Faso, one found that small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) increased child growth compared with a non-intervention control group, but zinc supplementation did not in the second study. 
Objectives : We explored whether the disparate growth outcomes were associated with differences in intervention components, household demographic variables, and/or children's morbidity. 
Methods : Children in the LNS study received 20g LNS daily containing different amounts of zinc (LNS). Children in the zinc supplementation study received different zinc supplementation regimens (Z-Suppl). Children in both studies were visited weekly for morbidity surveillance. Free malaria and diarrhea treatment was provided by the field worker in the LNS study, and by a village-based community-health worker in the zinc study. Anthropometric assessments were repeated every 13-16 weeks. For the present analyses, study intervals of the two studies were matched by child age and month of enrollment. The changes in length-for-age z-score (LAZ) per interval were compared between LNS and Z-Suppl groups using mixed model ANOVA or ANCOVA. Covariates were added to the model in blocks, and adjusted differences between group means were estimated. 
Results : Mean ages at enrollment of LNS (n = 1716) and Z-Suppl (n = 1720) were 9.4 +/- 0.4 and 10.1 +/- 2.7 months, respectively. The age-adjusted change in mean LAZ per interval declined less with LNS (-0.07 +/- 0.44) versus Z-Suppl (-0.21 +/- 0.43; p<0.0001). There was a significant group by interval interaction with the greatest difference found in 9-12 month old children (p<0.0001). Adjusting for demographic characteristics and morbidity did not reduce the observed differences by type of intervention, even though the morbidity burden was greater in the LNS group. 
Conclusions : Greater average physical growth in children who received LNS could not be explained by known cross-trial differences in baseline characteristics or morbidity burden, implying that the observed difference in growth response was partly due to LNS.},
  articleno    = {e0181770},
  author       = {Hess, Sonja Y and Peerson, Janet M and Becquey, Elodie and Abbeddou, Souheila and Ouédraogo, Césaire T and Somé, Jérôme W and Yakes Jimenez, Elizabeth and Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco and Vosti, Stephen A and Rouamba, Noël and Brown, Kenneth H},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  keywords     = {RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL,PREPUBERTAL CHILDREN,EARLY-CHILDHOOD,MALARIA,DIARRHEA,AGE,UNDERNUTRITION,INFANTS,WEIGHT,LENGTH},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {8},
  pages        = {19},
  title        = {Differing growth responses to nutritional supplements in neighboring health districts of Burkina Faso are likely due to benefits of small-quantity lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS)},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0181770},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2017},
}

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