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Iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented cereals : lessons drawn from Zimbabwean traditional porridges

Molly Gabaza (UGent)
(2018)
Author
Promoter
(UGent) , (UGent) and Maud Muchuweti
Organization
Abstract
Cereals contribute to a substantial proportion of the iron and zinc requirements of low income groups yet they are of low iron and zinc content and bioaccessibility (proportion of minerals available for absorption) due to their high level of mineral binding compounds. Fermentation is commonly practiced for the preparation of cereal products in developing countries and has potential to improve iron and zinc bioaccessibility through the reduction of mineral binding compounds. The purpose of this PhD was to evaluate the potential of fermentation to improve the iron and zinc bioaccessibility of cereal based complementary porridges commonly consumed in Zimbabwe and Africa at large. Finger millet porridges fermented at the household level were of low iron and zinc content and bioaccessibility which could not meet more than 50% of the dietary requirements of children between the ages of 1-3 years. Fermented cereals from five locations in Zimbabwe showed differences in both mineral contents and bioaccessibility that could be attributed to varietal and agricultural influences. Presence of soil iron on some cereals from Chiweshe and Chiredzi could improve the nutritional status of populations subsisting on such cereals. Of interest was the low zinc content and bioaccessibility on all cereals despite their origin suggesting the probable existence of a higher risk of zinc deficiency than iron. Food-to-food fortification using local ingredients such as baobab fruit pulp and mopane worm coupled with cereal fermentation could improve mineral nutrition in developing countries.
Keywords
iron, zinc, bioaccessibility, maize, sorghum, millet, fermentation

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Citation

Please use this url to cite or link to this publication:

Chicago
Gabaza, Molly. 2018. “Iron and Zinc Bioaccessibility of Fermented Cereals : Lessons Drawn from Zimbabwean Traditional Porridges”. Ghent, Belgium: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering.
APA
Gabaza, M. (2018). Iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented cereals : lessons drawn from Zimbabwean traditional porridges. Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering, Ghent, Belgium.
Vancouver
1.
Gabaza M. Iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented cereals : lessons drawn from Zimbabwean traditional porridges. [Ghent, Belgium]: Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering; 2018.
MLA
Gabaza, Molly. “Iron and Zinc Bioaccessibility of Fermented Cereals : Lessons Drawn from Zimbabwean Traditional Porridges.” 2018 : n. pag. Print.
@phdthesis{8546664,
  abstract     = {Cereals contribute to a substantial proportion of the iron and zinc requirements of low income groups yet they are of low iron and zinc content and bioaccessibility (proportion of minerals available for absorption) due to their high level of mineral binding compounds. Fermentation is commonly practiced for the preparation of cereal products in developing countries and has potential to improve iron and zinc bioaccessibility through the reduction of mineral binding compounds. The purpose of this PhD was to evaluate the potential of fermentation to improve the iron and zinc bioaccessibility of cereal based complementary porridges commonly consumed in Zimbabwe and Africa at large. 
Finger millet porridges fermented at the household level were of low iron and zinc content and bioaccessibility which could not meet more than 50\% of the dietary requirements of children between the ages of 1-3 years. Fermented cereals from five locations in Zimbabwe showed differences in both mineral contents and bioaccessibility that could be attributed to varietal and agricultural influences. Presence of soil iron on some cereals from Chiweshe and Chiredzi could improve the nutritional status of populations subsisting on such cereals. Of interest was the low zinc content and bioaccessibility on all cereals despite their origin suggesting the probable existence of a higher risk of zinc deficiency than iron. Food-to-food fortification using local ingredients such as baobab fruit pulp and mopane worm coupled with cereal fermentation could improve mineral nutrition in developing countries.},
  author       = {Gabaza, Molly},
  isbn         = {9789463570794},
  language     = {eng},
  pages        = {XX, 234},
  publisher    = {Ghent University. Faculty of Bioscience Engineering},
  school       = {Ghent University},
  title        = {Iron and zinc bioaccessibility of fermented cereals : lessons drawn from Zimbabwean traditional porridges},
  year         = {2018},
}