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Prone hip extension muscle recruitment is associated with hamstring injury risk in amateur soccer

Joke Schuermans (UGent) , Damien Van Tiggelen (UGent) and Erik Witvrouw (UGent)
Author
Organization
Abstract
'Core stability' is considered essential in rehabilitation and prevention. Particularly with respect to hamstring injury prevention, assessment and training of lumbo-pelvic control is thought to be key. However, supporting scientific evidence is lacking. To explore the importance of proximal neuromuscular function with regard to hamstring injury susceptibility, this study investigated the association between the Prone Hip Extension (PHE) muscle activation pattern and hamstring injury incidence in amateur soccer players. 60 healthy male soccer players underwent a comprehensive clinical examination, comprising a range of motion assessments and the investigation of the posterior chain muscle activation pattern during PHE. Subsequently, hamstring injury incidence was recorded prospectively throughout a 1.5-season monitoring period. Players who were injured presented a PHE activation pattern that differed significantly from those who did not. Contrary to the controls, hamstring activity onset was significantly delayed (p = 0.018), resulting in a shifted activation sequence. Players were 8 times more likely to get injured if the hamstring muscles were activated after the lumbar erector spinae instead of vice versa (p = 0.009). Assessment of muscle recruitment during PHE demonstrated to be useful in injury prediction, suggesting that neuromuscular coordination in the posterior chain influences hamstring injury vulnerability.
Keywords
LOW-BACK-PAIN, MEDICAL-RESEARCH PROGRAM, PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL, AUSTRALIAN-FOOTBALL, SCREENING-TESTS, BICEPS FEMORIS, STRAIN INJURY, PLAYERS, SPORT, ACTIVATION, hamstring muscle injury, soccer, physical examination, surface, electromyography, risk assessment

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MLA
Schuermans, Joke, et al. “Prone Hip Extension Muscle Recruitment Is Associated with Hamstring Injury Risk in Amateur Soccer.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol. 38, no. 9, 2017, pp. 696–706, doi:10.1055/s-0043-103016.
APA
Schuermans, J., Van Tiggelen, D., & Witvrouw, E. (2017). Prone hip extension muscle recruitment is associated with hamstring injury risk in amateur soccer. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 38(9), 696–706. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0043-103016
Chicago author-date
Schuermans, Joke, Damien Van Tiggelen, and Erik Witvrouw. 2017. “Prone Hip Extension Muscle Recruitment Is Associated with Hamstring Injury Risk in Amateur Soccer.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE 38 (9): 696–706. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-0043-103016.
Chicago author-date (all authors)
Schuermans, Joke, Damien Van Tiggelen, and Erik Witvrouw. 2017. “Prone Hip Extension Muscle Recruitment Is Associated with Hamstring Injury Risk in Amateur Soccer.” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE 38 (9): 696–706. doi:10.1055/s-0043-103016.
Vancouver
1.
Schuermans J, Van Tiggelen D, Witvrouw E. Prone hip extension muscle recruitment is associated with hamstring injury risk in amateur soccer. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE. 2017;38(9):696–706.
IEEE
[1]
J. Schuermans, D. Van Tiggelen, and E. Witvrouw, “Prone hip extension muscle recruitment is associated with hamstring injury risk in amateur soccer,” INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol. 38, no. 9, pp. 696–706, 2017.
@article{8545740,
  abstract     = {{'Core stability' is considered essential in rehabilitation and prevention. Particularly with respect to hamstring injury prevention, assessment and training of lumbo-pelvic control is thought to be key. However, supporting scientific evidence is lacking. To explore the importance of proximal neuromuscular function with regard to hamstring injury susceptibility, this study investigated the association between the Prone Hip Extension (PHE) muscle activation pattern and hamstring injury incidence in amateur soccer players. 60 healthy male soccer players underwent a comprehensive clinical examination, comprising a range of motion assessments and the investigation of the posterior chain muscle activation pattern during PHE. Subsequently, hamstring injury incidence was recorded prospectively throughout a 1.5-season monitoring period. Players who were injured presented a PHE activation pattern that differed significantly from those who did not. Contrary to the controls, hamstring activity onset was significantly delayed (p = 0.018), resulting in a shifted activation sequence. Players were 8 times more likely to get injured if the hamstring muscles were activated after the lumbar erector spinae instead of vice versa (p = 0.009). Assessment of muscle recruitment during PHE demonstrated to be useful in injury prediction, suggesting that neuromuscular coordination in the posterior chain influences hamstring injury vulnerability.}},
  author       = {{Schuermans, Joke and Van Tiggelen, Damien and Witvrouw, Erik}},
  issn         = {{0172-4622}},
  journal      = {{INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE}},
  keywords     = {{LOW-BACK-PAIN,MEDICAL-RESEARCH PROGRAM,PROFESSIONAL FOOTBALL,AUSTRALIAN-FOOTBALL,SCREENING-TESTS,BICEPS FEMORIS,STRAIN INJURY,PLAYERS,SPORT,ACTIVATION,hamstring muscle injury,soccer,physical examination,surface,electromyography,risk assessment}},
  language     = {{eng}},
  number       = {{9}},
  pages        = {{696--706}},
  title        = {{Prone hip extension muscle recruitment is associated with hamstring injury risk in amateur soccer}},
  url          = {{http://dx.doi.org/10.1055/s-0043-103016}},
  volume       = {{38}},
  year         = {{2017}},
}

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