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Effects of urbanization on host-pathogen interactions, using Yersinia in house sparrows as a model

(2017) PLOS ONE. 12(12).
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Abstract
Urbanization strongly affects biodiversity, altering natural communities and often leading to a reduced species richness. Yet, despite its increasingly recognized importance, how urbanization impacts on the health of individual animals, wildlife populations and on disease ecology remains poorly understood. To test whether, and how, urbanization-driven ecosystem alterations influence pathogen dynamics and avian health, we use house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and Yersinia spp. (pathogenic for passerines) as a case study. Sparrows are granivorous urban exploiters, whose western European populations have declined over the past decades, especially in highly urbanized areas. We sampled 329 house sparrows originating from 36 populations along an urbanization gradient across Flanders (Belgium), and used isolation combined with 'matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry' (MALDI-TOF MS) and PCR methods for detecting the presence of different Yersinia species. Yersinia spp. were recovered from 57.43% of the sampled house sparrows, of which 4.06%, 53.30% and 69.54% were identified as Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica and other Yersinia species, respectively. Presence of Yersinia was related to the degree of urbanization, average daily temperatures and the community of granivorous birds present at sparrow capture locations. Body condition of suburban house sparrows was found to be higher compared to urban and rural house sparrows, but no relationships between sparrows' body condition and presence of Yersinia spp. were found. We conclude that two determinants of pathogen infection dynamics, body condition and pathogen occurrence, vary along an urbanization gradient, potentially mediating the impact of urbanization on avian health.
Keywords
ENTEROCOLITICA BIOTYPE 1A, WILD BIRDS, PASSER-DOMESTICUS, SPECIES-DIVERSITY, MASS-SPECTROMETRY, MIGRATORY BIRDS, RURAL GRADIENT, LONG-TERM, PSEUDOTUBERCULOSIS, URBAN

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Chicago
Rouffaer, Lieze, Diederik Strubbe, Aimeric Teyssier, Noraine Salleh Hudin, Anne-Marie Van Den Abeele, Ivo Cox, Roel Haesendonck, et al. 2017. “Effects of Urbanization on Host-pathogen Interactions, Using Yersinia in House Sparrows as a Model.” Plos One 12 (12).
APA
Rouffaer, L., Strubbe, D., Teyssier, A., Salleh Hudin, N., Van Den Abeele, A.-M., Cox, I., Haesendonck, R., et al. (2017). Effects of urbanization on host-pathogen interactions, using Yersinia in house sparrows as a model. PLOS ONE, 12(12).
Vancouver
1.
Rouffaer L, Strubbe D, Teyssier A, Salleh Hudin N, Van Den Abeele A-M, Cox I, et al. Effects of urbanization on host-pathogen interactions, using Yersinia in house sparrows as a model. PLOS ONE. 2017;12(12).
MLA
Rouffaer, Lieze, Diederik Strubbe, Aimeric Teyssier, et al. “Effects of Urbanization on Host-pathogen Interactions, Using Yersinia in House Sparrows as a Model.” PLOS ONE 12.12 (2017): n. pag. Print.
@article{8545133,
  abstract     = {Urbanization strongly affects biodiversity, altering natural communities and often leading to a reduced species richness. Yet, despite its increasingly recognized importance, how urbanization impacts on the health of individual animals, wildlife populations and on disease ecology remains poorly understood. To test whether, and how, urbanization-driven ecosystem alterations influence pathogen dynamics and avian health, we use house sparrows (Passer domesticus) and Yersinia spp. (pathogenic for passerines) as a case study. Sparrows are granivorous urban exploiters, whose western European populations have declined over the past decades, especially in highly urbanized areas. We sampled 329 house sparrows originating from 36 populations along an urbanization gradient across Flanders (Belgium), and used isolation combined with 'matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry' (MALDI-TOF MS) and PCR methods for detecting the presence of different Yersinia species. Yersinia spp. were recovered from 57.43\% of the sampled house sparrows, of which 4.06\%, 53.30\% and 69.54\% were identified as Y. pseudotuberculosis, Y. enterocolitica and other Yersinia species, respectively. Presence of Yersinia was related to the degree of urbanization, average daily temperatures and the community of granivorous birds present at sparrow capture locations. Body condition of suburban house sparrows was found to be higher compared to urban and rural house sparrows, but no relationships between sparrows' body condition and presence of Yersinia spp. were found. We conclude that two determinants of pathogen infection dynamics, body condition and pathogen occurrence, vary along an urbanization gradient, potentially mediating the impact of urbanization on avian health.},
  articleno    = {e0189509},
  author       = {Rouffaer, Lieze and Strubbe, Diederik and Teyssier, Aimeric and Salleh Hudin, Noraine and Van Den Abeele, Anne-Marie and Cox, Ivo and Haesendonck, Roel and Delm{\'e}e, Michel and Haesebrouck, Freddy and Pasmans, Frank and Lens, Luc and Martel, An},
  issn         = {1932-6203},
  journal      = {PLOS ONE},
  language     = {eng},
  number       = {12},
  pages        = {15},
  title        = {Effects of urbanization on host-pathogen interactions, using Yersinia in house sparrows as a model},
  url          = {http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0189509},
  volume       = {12},
  year         = {2017},
}

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